Thanks To Annette McLeod, Dana Priest, Anne Hull, and C-SPAN: Democracy in Action

This morning I watched on C-SPAN as Annette McLeod testified in front of a House Committee investigating conditions at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  The investigation is the result of the fallout surrounding the Washington Post article written by Dana Priest and Anne Hull.  Ms. McLeod is the wife of Cpl. Wendell McLeod who was severely wounded in Iraq.  She testified along with two wounded veterans on the various problems and challenges confronting the staff at Walter Reed.  I applaud Annette McLeod for her courage and ability to maintain her composure as she shared what is by all accounts an emotionally draining experience that has perhaps been exacerbated by the inadequacies at Walter Reed.  This president has made a farce of the concept of national sacrifice.  The only people who have truly sacrificed are the men and women fighting in Iraq along with their families back home.  To think that their physical and psychological wounds have not been met with the best of what this country can offer in medical care is frightening and sad.

I applaud Dana Priest and Anne Hull for their investigative piece and I do hope that they are rewarded with a Pulitzer Prize.  This is newspaper reporting at its best.  Finally, thanks to C-SPAN for giving those interested access to the workings of our government without the distracting commentary of political pundits and other interested parties.

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2 comments… add one

  • Jim Mar 7, 2007

    “This president has made a farce of the concept of national sacrifice.” Can you expand on what you mean here? I once mentioned to my grandmother whose grandfather fought in the Civil War, whose husband fought in WWI, and whose son fought in Vietnam that war seems to be fought by the “poor” man but directed by the “rich” man. Her response was, “that has always been the case”. So, how is this war any different? Wouldn’t a military draft across all socio-economic stratas be closer to a “national sacrifice”?

    Thanks, Jim

  • Jim Mar 7, 2007

    Typo Correction: husband fought in WWII. Thanks, Jim

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