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Bunker_fig09b
My post on the large Confederate flag planned for one of Florida's highways was picked up by the History Channel's Message Boards.  One reader left the following after having read it:

"That blog is just another one of the Yankee Bigot Blogs."

Image: "The Yankee Nero," Comic News, December 27, 1864

7 comments… add one

  • Matt McKeon Jun 2, 2008

    Has the “Yankee Bigot Blog” name been snapped up already? Because that would be a cool name!

  • Kevin Levin Jun 2, 2008

    Matt, — I was going to consider using it as a new subtitle for my blog, but I guess I can hand it over to you. (LOL)

  • Chris Jun 3, 2008

    “Yankee Bigot Blog” – that would be a ridiculously funny blog name…

    Anyway, Kevin, I am a bit concerned about your Internet usage time. How in the heck do you have time to teach, write, read, research, blog, and then visit all these sites. I have not been to the History Channel boards (and many others) in months… I am about 2 weeks removed from teaching and just now feel like I can multi-task again… you might want to step away from the computer man.

  • Kevin Levin Jun 3, 2008

    Thanks for the concern Chris. You may be surprised to hear that I don’t spend much time at all maintaining this blog. I only came across the History Channel link from looking at my sitemeter. I don’t read any of the message boards and I spend much less time reading other blogs. The only think I check are the few news feeds that I’ve set up and if I write a post it’s usually in the morning before I start on other things. Anyway, thanks for the concern and enjoy the summer.

  • Woodrowfan Jun 3, 2008

    The argument that Lincoln wanted to save the Union, not free the slaves, is also a bit of slight of hand if you are discussing the Southern reasons for secession. If you read the Southern states’ declarations when they announced their (attempted) secession, as well as the Cornerstone Speech by the CSA vice-president, it’s clear that by “state’s rights” they meant their right to own slaves and that they feared Lincoln’s administration would hinder that right. Whatever Lincoln said during the war not as important as what the slave states THOUGHT he would do and it’s clear from the documents of the time that they believed he’d interfere with slavery “rights.” The “oh wait, it wasn’t REALLY about slavery” argument appears after the South lost the war and they began trying to deal emotionally with their defeat by finding other justifications for their part in the war.

  • Chris Jun 3, 2008

    Kevin I hope you know I was kidding…

  • Kevin Levin Jun 3, 2008

    Of course I do Chris. I only pointed it out because I’ve had others who inquire about how much time I actually spend on it.

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