Re-enacting “Pickett’s Charge” in Ideal Weather?

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Read the story here: “The combination of moderate temperatures, a pleasant breeze and
overcast skies made for the perfect environment for a battle, at least
from the re-enactors viewpoint, since it minimized the chances of
succumbing during the battle to heat-related problems.  Excessive heat and humidity can drain the energy level and exuberance of the re-enactors and affect the animals as well.”

Yes, I’ve heard that this can be an issue for reenactors who strive for authenticity.

2 thoughts on “Re-enacting “Pickett’s Charge” in Ideal Weather?

  1. Wayne Fielder

    I love that. I remember the 2006 National reenactment at Perryville Kentucky where a group of “hardcore” reenactors were a bit miffed that they had to walk about a quarter mile or so for potable water. They had specifically asked for a “remote” camp site so they got it…then gripe because of the stroll to water?

    I still chuckle about it. Gotta love those guys. They do have nice suits tho.

    Reply
  2. Tim Abbott

    On the other hand, it was well above 90 degrees up at Ticonderoga with brutal humidity for the 250th anniversary of the French and Indian War battle of Carillon: conditions similar to those on July 8th, 1758. I saw just one unit of British reenactors opting to go up against the French in their weskits, causing some of the other participants to ask whether it was Dress Down Day for His Majesty’s Regiments of Foot. The grenadiers, however, stayed in their miter caps and bearskins and the Highlanders braved the thorns in their kilts and knee socks. I overhead a conversation between some regimental drummers and a high ranking British officer who cautioned that the field was full of briers ands thistles that would make it hard for those without gaiters or leggings. The green-coated drummer of the Highland Grenadiers in his socks and kilt gamely said that the thistle was the flower of Scotland, to which the general wryly replied that it was a Scottish flower to a certain height, but then became an English spear.

    Love it.

    Reply

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