The Civil War in Atlantic City, New Jersey?

5774_135052528553_768043553_3159593_2128194_nI just returned from a brief trip home to see the folks in Jersey.  My wife and I spent one day walking the beautiful beaches in Ventnor and Margate before meeting up with the family for Chinese food.  With a few hours to kill and a hearty appetite we decided to go for a little appetizer at the world famous White House Subs in Atlantic City – just one of my many old stomping grounds.  Hey, I can get Chinese food anywhere, but where I am I going to find a decent sub outside of Jersey?  Forget about it.

A few blocks past the large parking lot that once included my high school on Albany Avenue, I noticed what appeared to be a typical Civil War monument that you will find in many parks in the northeast.  A quick stop revealed that it was indeed a Civil War monument and I am embarrassed to admit that I never noticed it before.  All I know about it is that the monument was dedicated in 1916.  Given that the city did not exist in the 1860s it would be interesting to know why the community decided to honor the veterans.  Perhaps enough of them moved to the city for health reasons that it was warranted.

I have no doubt that as a high school delinquent I smoked a few cigarettes while sitting at the monument’s base before trying to sneak into the closest casino.

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5 comments… add one

  • Bryant Simon Aug 10, 2009

    Funny I drove by that monument last week and had the very same question. I guess local boosters thought there was some money to made memorializing the Civil War. Let me know what you find. And viva the White House. (By the way, I go to Saigon when in town — I know not Chinese but still good.)

  • Kevin Levin Aug 11, 2009

    Hi Bryant,

    I will let you know what I find. Next time I will definitely hit Saigon. My two other favorite spots include Tony’s Baltimore Grille and Los Amigos. No doubt, you’ve spent time in both. :)

    By the way, if you are interested in the history of Atlantic City I highly recommend Bryant’s book Boardwalk of Dreams (Oxford University Press, 2006) http://www.amazon.com/Boardwalk-Dreams-Atlantic-Urban-America/dp/0195308093/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1249991283&sr=8-2

  • James F. Epperson Aug 11, 2009

    The best subs in the world are the grinders in New London, CT, where I
    went to high school. Nothing else comes close.

  • Kevin Levin Aug 11, 2009

    James,

    I’m not going to get into a debate about this with you, but you must be out of your mind. :)

  • TF Smith Aug 11, 2009

    Interesting find, Kevin.

    Of course, one thing is that in 1916, the Civil War was well within the living memory of many Americans, including many of the elite; Robert Todd Lincoln, for example, lived until 1926, and was featured on the cover of Time.

    Demographically, one or more of the founders/boosters behind AC’s development could have been CW veterans…or certainly the sons of CW veterans.

    Was there a “local” CW regiment from that part of NJ? Given the 1916 date, there’s also the question of the Preparedness Movement, and its impact on CW memory…

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