Dislaimer

Update: All I can say is that if you are going to write a letter to my boss complaining about this blog at least take the time to proofread it.

I’ve never had to issue a formal disclaimer for this blog, but with the start of the new school year now seems like an opportune time, especially for a select few.  It goes without saying that the views expressed on this site are mine and mine alone.  I do not write in any official capacity as the department chair and as a history teacher at St. Anne’s – Belfield School, though I do write about my experiences in the classroom.  Civil War Memory has no official connection to my place of employment and the St. Anne’s – Belfield School does not endorse this site in any way.  The URL of this site is is not associated with the school and this website is financially maintained by me.

I hope that clarifies things.

8 thoughts on “Dislaimer

  1. Beauregard

    Ridiculous that someone would write your employer. You always respond to contrary opinions (including mine) respectfully and acknowledge when something you have posted is contradicted by the historical record – our exchange regarding General Cleburne is an example.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      I appreciate that. It’s really nothing to worry about. I am actually saving all the emails and letters for an essay, tentatively titled, “My Adventures in Blogging.” :D

      Reply
    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      You are absolutely right and I accept this as a consequence of maintaining an online presence. I stay focused on the benefits that blogging have bestowed on me over the years. It has advanced my professional career in ways that I could not have imagined and it benefits my employer as well.

      Reply
  2. Robert Taubman

    It’s not uncommon for someone to write to an employer and complain about online/internet postings. It’s at best a rather scurulous means for someone to try and muzzle debate. Almost like being an online bully. Best to ignore them and consider the source. Obviously this person was unable to debate you on a level field.

    Reply
  3. Ken Noe

    Many years ago in Georgia, I received an angry note from an anonymous student. What I remember most is the student’s sad inability to even correctly spell common four-letter obscenities. Certainly it ruined the intended effect.

    Reply
    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      Sounds like you have a good sense of what I read yesterday. It begins by addressing the headmaster of my school by his first name.

      Reply
  4. Brian W. Schoeneman

    They can take the time to write the letter, but can’t be bothered to proof it? That’s pathetic.

    Even if I disagree with how you handle yourself on occasion, writing to the school doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.

    Reply

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