Preserving Black History On Their Own Terms

I get a real kick out of the good folks over at the Southern Heritage Preservation site.  They spend a great deal of time calling for the preservation of African-American history by pushing the black Confederate narrative, but when a black man disagrees with their preferred view of the war all bets are off.  Consider this little give and take over an editorial written by Tony Norman for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  The editorial is par for the course compared with most editorials written this year.  Norman places too much weight on recent polls and completely ignores the dramatic changes that can be seen in recent Civil War commemorations and the overall public dialog.  That hasn’t prevented the folks at SHP from going for the jugular.  For people who are committed to preserving black history they sure don’t have much patience for black people.

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It’s a sad testament to the way they think. Black history should be remembered, but only as they, a group of white men, think it should be.

Really?
Humm I will be sure to tell one Mr. Nelson Windbush, SCV member and Black Confederate descendant you said so.
Likewise I notice that Mr. Levin, Andy Hall and Corey Meyer are all…..oh yeah palefaces, all of whom seem to have quite the time “refuting” African Americans loyal to the Southland in its time of defense.

Carl,

Since you are such a good friend of Mr. Winbush, maybe you could get him to write a post or provide his information on his grandfather that shows his service in the southern army. I think it would kind of be like Obama releasing his long form birth certificate…finally putting the questions of Mr. Winbush’s grandfather’s service to bed. I don’t deny his statements, but if you read Kevin’s recent post on Silas Chandler you will understand the need for evidence.

Wikipedia on Nelson Winbush says his great grandfather, Louis Napoleon, was a slave on the “Oldham Plantation” and served in the 7th Tennessee Infantry, PACS as successively a cook, rifleman and chaplain.

Historical Data Systems’ data base does not locate anyone named “Winbush” serving in the PACS from Tennessee. Indeed, the only “Winbush” they locate is Alonzo, a private in the 10th Tennessee Cavalry, USV! HDS’s regimental listing for the 7th Tennessee does not list anyone named “Oldham.” There are 27 Odhams serving in the PACS from Tennessee but none in the 7th Infantry.

None of the Wikipedia references offer any details on Winbush’s alleged service.

HIs grandfather was not a soldier. He deserves to be remembered and even celebrated by his descendants, but not as a soldier.

I made a mistake in my posting earlier on Nelson Winbush’s Black Confederate ancestor. I missed that the ancestor was named Nelson not Winbush. It doesn’t change the results – actually confirms that Louis Neson did not serve in the Confederate Army.

Wikipedia on Nelson Winbush says his great grandfather, Louis Napoleon Nelson, was a slave on the “James Oldham Plantation” and served in the 7th Tennessee Infantry, PACS as successively a cook, rifleman and chaplain.

Historical Data Systems’ data base locates only one Louis Nelson serving in the PACS, a private in the First Alabama, none from Tennessee. HDS’s regimental listing for the 7th Tennessee does not list anyone named “Oldham.” There are 27 Odhams serving in the PACS from Tennessee but none in the 7th Infantry.

None of the Wikipedia references offer any references or footnotes on Louis Nelson’s alleged service.

The 1860 census identifies “James Oldham” as a ten year old living with his father and three brothers. Hardly a plantation owner!

The 1870 Census for Lauderdale County, Tennessee shows Louis Nelson as an 18 year old living with his family in Ripley. That means he was born about 1851-1853, a maximum of 14 when the war ended. The 1880 Census agrees, with an estimated birth year of 1853.

The 1930 Census shows the year old Nelson Winbush living in Lauderdale County, but the Census does not locate anyone named Louis Nelson living in the County. By the way, I just noticed, according to the Wikipedia listing, that Louis Nelson died in 1934 when Nelson Winbush was all of five. I have some vague memories of *my* great grandmother who died when I was five or six but as to anything she did when she was young, well that would be information from my grandparents or my mother.

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