“Gay and Lesbian Sons and Daughters of the Southern Confederacy”

This is a cute little country song about a town in the pan handle of Florida that was taken aback by an entry into their Fourth of July Parade.  Click here for more information about Grant Peeples.  Enjoy.

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9 thoughts on ““Gay and Lesbian Sons and Daughters of the Southern Confederacy”

  1. Michael Lynch

    I predict that in a few decades, if homosexuality becomes a universally accepted fact of American life, we’ll be seeing websites claiming that gay rights were much more secure in the South than in the North, and that the Confederacy enlisted thousands of gay troops and instructing their military chaplains to perform same-sex marriages on the battlefield. The SCV will call in reporters for photo ops in which they decorate the graves of forgotten gay southern patriots (whose status as gay southern patriots will be substantiated by creative readings of pension applications and newspaper clippings), and we’ll hear all about how Yankee historians have erased the memory of all those thousands of brave gay Rebels and their devoted service to the Lost Cause.

    In fact, since the environmentalist movement is so popular, I’m surprised we haven’t been hearing that plantation agriculture was more ecologically friendly than greedy northern manufacturing.

    –ML

    Reply
    1. Kevin Levin Post author

      Michael,

      If I ever create a hall of fame for Civil War Memory comments yours will be the first entry. :-)

      Reply
    2. Rob Baker

      Michael that is highly unlikely. The SCV would never be able to explain why the Gay Confederates allowed there to be such shabby uncolorful uniforms for the entire war.

      Reply
  2. Ray O'Hara

    the GLBTA insists on marching on St Patricks Day in South Boston.
    the Parade directors managed to keep them out of the parade proper but they are allowed to march afterwards when everybody has retired to the bars along Broadway and Day Blvd so there are never any spectators.

    their marching never has anything to do with the event but is instead strictly a “look at me” event. it seems to me they should buy some uniforms and instruments and learn to march and play and much opposition would go away.

    pissing people off just to piss them off and then laughing at the shocked reaction is not the way tro win friends and allies.

    Reply
    1. Marianne Davis

      Perhaps you can explain what they else they might do, since it appears that they were pissing you off just by existing. The parade “proper”? Can you think of anything that is more properly defined as “strictly a ‘look at me’ event” than a PARADE? I’m laughing, too.

      Reply
      1. Ray O'Hara

        It doesn’t piss me off, and what would you call marching 4 hours after the parade iover other than not being allowed in the parade proper {that means the official parade if it went past you}

        they aren’t there to celebrate St Pats day and puke green beer. thats what I mean.
        and do you think some hairy guy wearing a pink tutu actually advances their cause for acceptance. I don’t, I think it sets the it back, it reinforces every stereotype people have..
        and I’d guess the same goes for a group like a Confed “Heritage” group. sure it’s fun to tweak conservatives but then after doing that one shouldn’t be surprised when they don’t support things like gay marriage and civil rights.

        Reply
        1. Kate Halleron

          Hm. I used to live in Lexington, Ky. There was regularly a drag queen float in the 4th of July parade, and that was in the ’80s. I saw a few snickers and a few raised eyebrows, but I never heard a word of criticism. If people muttered at all, they muttered in their beer, afterward.

          What reason does supposedly liberal Boston have for excluding gays from the St. Paddy’s parade? I’m sure there are plenty of gay Irishmen-and-women. Who else do they purposely exclude?

          Reply
          1. Marianne Davis

            I think this all boils down to one thing, whenever we ascribe some special dignity to having a certain lineage, ancestry, or practice, we run into trouble. This holds true whenever we determine that “people like us” are worthy of respect and regard, while “those others” are suspect. That’s why it is possible for the SCV, the NAACP, the Old Hibernians and Dykes on Bikes to be painfully, laughably wrong all at the same time.

            Reply

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