Saturday Night Live Interprets Camp Servants

Somehow I missed this recent SNL skit about the Civil War.  It’s kind of funny and even offers an interpretation of how camp servants ended up in some of those wartime and postwar images. 🙂  Enjoy.

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6 comments… add one
  • D.G. Foulke Sep 25, 2011 @ 6:05

    Funny indeed. It’s not a recent show, however. Phil Hartman (Gen. Lee) died quite some time back (1998), and the description of the show (accurately) states that it’s an excerpt from Season 16, Ep. 6 – which would place it in . . . 1990.

    I did enjoy. Thanks.

  • TF Smith Sep 25, 2011 @ 6:15

    Since Phil Hartman (as Lee) is in it, that has to date back a few years, but still pretty funny. Not quite historical – Hood with one arm and Stuart and Beuregard? – but entertaining.

    A nice coda would have been to have a SCV-type in modern dress “explaining” how Col. Nero was the deputy chief of staff for the CSCT, or something similar, while examining the sepia tone photograph, and thus proving how the Civil War was not “about slavery.”

    Best,

    • Margaret D. Blough Sep 25, 2011 @ 22:49

      Phil Hartman made a surprisingly good General Lee.

  • Kevin Levin Sep 25, 2011 @ 6:24

    I must have been looking at the upload date. I noticed the old cast as well.

  • Jeffry Burden Sep 25, 2011 @ 19:39

    Phil Hartman actually made a pretty impressive Lee. Talented guy, he was.

  • Dudley Bokoski Sep 26, 2011 @ 16:06

    Makes me think about the actors who played Civil War figures, and the horrible historical movie (but funny because it was so awful) “Santa Fe Trail” which featured Ronald Reagan as J. E. B. Stuart and Errol Flynn as Custer, plus a really bizarre recreation of Harper’s Ferry.

    On the acting score, I was impressed with Martin Sheen’s Robert E. Lee. I didn’t figure he could pull it off, but talent won out. What a fine actor. Too bad “Gettysburg” made Longstreet into such a tower of strength at Gettysburg. If they had portrayed his petulance it would have been a more interesting movie.

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