Common-place: List of Contributors

monkey and organ grinderYou may remember that Megan Kate Nelson and I are co-editing a special edition of Common-place on the Civil War Sesquicentennial, which should be published in early 2014.  We just finished getting together our list of contributors and it looks awesome. We’ve covered a great deal of ground from how the war is being taught in the classroom to interpretation in museums as well as how the war is being commemorated across the country and beyond. This issue is going to have a little bit for everyone interested in this important subject.

Here is our list of contributors as of today:

  • Chris Lese, Teaching Civil War Memory in the Classroom
  • John Hennessy, Public History and Memory at the NPS
  • Ari Kelman, Native Americans, the West and Civil War Memory
  • Frances Clarke, War Memory as a Global Phenomenon
  • Carrie Janney, commemoration and reconciliation
  • Matt Hulbert, memories of guerrilla warfare (Missouri)
  • Manisha Sinha, abolitionism and memory
  • Adam Arenson, on going back to the battlefield
  • Judy Giesberg on Emilie Davis and digital memory
  • Anne Marshall on Lincoln in Kentucky
  • Steve Berry—Introduction
  • Andrew Talkov–museums

Megan and I seem to be getting along like a monkey and an organ grinder. It’s still unclear as to which roles we are playing.

About the author: Thank you for taking the time to read this post. What next? Scroll down and join the discussion in the comments section. Looking for more Civil War content? You can follow me on Twitter. Check out my forthcoming book, Searching For Black Confederates: The Civil War’s Most Persistent Myth, which is the first book-length analysis of the black Confederate myth ever published. Pre-order your copy today.

3 comments… add one
  • Will Stoutamire Jun 3, 2013 @ 9:11

    Sounds like a great collection of articles, Kevin. Looking forward to reading it!

    • Kevin Levin Jun 3, 2013 @ 9:31

      I am excited as well. Thanks, Will.

  • Pat Young Jun 3, 2013 @ 22:07

    Nothing on immigrants? -Either how they are remembered today or how to teach modern immigrants about the war.

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