New to the Civil War Memory Library, 11/23

Updates: First, I hope that all of you had an enjoyable Thanksgiving. I am spending much of my break reviewing the copy edits for Searching For Black Confederates. Within a few months I should have the page proofs in hand, which is the final stage before the book goes to print next Fall.

I trust that all of you have checked out the new content page that I am calling ‘News.’ It’s a space that I am using for short updates that don’t warrant a full post.

Peter S. Carmichael, The War For the Common Soldier: How Men Thought, Fought, and Survived in Civil War Armies (University of North Carolina Press, 2018).

Sarah Churchwell, Behold, America: The Entangled History of “America First” and “The American Dream” (Basic Books, 2019).

Aaron Sheehan-Dean, The Calculus of Violence: How Americans Fought the Civil War (Harvard University Press, 2018).

Andrew Delbanco, The War Before the War: Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle for America’s Soul from the Revolution to the Civil War (Penguin Press, 2018).

Patricia Miller, Bringing Down the Colonel: A Sex Scandal of the Gilded Age, and the “Powerless” Woman Who Took On Washington (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018).

Nina Silber, This War Ain’t Over: Fighting the Civil War in New Deal America (University of North Carolina Press, 2018).

Amy Murrell Taylor, Embattled Freedom: Journeys Through the Civil War’s Slave Refugee Camps (University of North Carolina Press, 2018).

5 comments… add one
  • Rob Wick Nov 23, 2018 @ 15:10

    Thanks for the heads-up, Kevin. I’m especially interested in Silber’s book and how she handles Carl Sandburg in her chapter on Lincoln.

    Best
    Rob

    • Kevin Levin Nov 23, 2018 @ 15:17

      Plenty on Sanburg. I read a couple of chapters in manuscript form. You will definitely want to pick this one up.

  • Brad Nov 27, 2018 @ 7:36

    Any thoughts on the Delbanco book?

    • Kevin Levin Nov 27, 2018 @ 10:42

      He’s an excellent writer. I could do without the constant references to current politics, which sometimes works to deepen historical understanding, but more often than not just seems like unbridled presentism.

      • Brad Nov 29, 2018 @ 20:04

        Thanks.

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