“Our World Was About To Explode Over the Issue of Slavery”

The trailer for “Field of Lost Shoes” looks pretty good. It will be interesting to see how certain individuals and groups respond given the overt ways in which this story is couched in a broader narrative of slavery. At one point in the trailer a young VMI cadet shares with his fellow student that, “We should not be fighting to keep others in chains.”

[Uploaded to YouTube on September 2, 2014]

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“Atlanta Is Ours, and Fairly Won” 150

Sherman

Sherman

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New to the Civil War Memory Library, 09/01

Heading back into the classroom tomorrow, but I hope to make time to get through these new releases at some point. Best of luck to all of you who are preparing for a new school year as well.

Heart of Dixie

Edward E. Baptist, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism (Basic Books, 2014).

Todd Brewster, Lincoln’s Gamble: The Tumultuous Six Months that Gave America the Emancipation Proclamation and Changed the Course of the Civil War (Scribner, 2014).

George Kimball, A Corporal’s Story: Civil War Recollections of the Twelfth Massachusetts (University of Oklahoma Press, 2014).

James Oakes, The Scorpion’s Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War (Norton, 2014).

Anne S. Rubin, Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (University of North Carolina Press, 2014).

Jonathan White, Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln (Louisiana State University Press, 2014).

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“Massive Resistance” Generation Responds to the Committee

Washington & LeeI have absolutely no problem with students and alumni at Washington & Lee University expressing disagreement with the school’s decision regarding the display of Confederate flags in Lee Chapel. After all, it’s their school. I expressed concerns about the Committee’s list of demands early on so I am certainly sympathetic to both sides. But there is something disturbing about the two alumni letters published in the most recent issue of the school’s magazine, both of who graduated during the civil rights era.

Both letters frame this dispute as if the black law students who made their concerns public don’t really belong at the school.

Only the Committee threatens students and the University should they not buckle down to embrace the Committee’s terms.

I am sorry but this group of students cannot threaten the student body because they are a part of it. It is their school. It is their right as students to voice their concerns when they perceive an injustice or other problem that deserves attention. And if “the concerns of these students should [not] be taken seriously” than whose should be taken seriously and under what conditions? [click to continue…]

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The U.S. Grant of Social Commentary

I got a kick out of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Twitter profile page.

Ulysses S. Grant, Ta-Nehisi Coates

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