First African American Senator From the South Since Reconstruction

Congratulations to Republican Congressman Tim Scott, who was tapped by South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley to fill the seat vacated by outgoing Senator Jim DeMint.  Scott is the first black Senator to serve from a Southern state since the era of Reconstruction:

Scott hails from the Palmetto State’s staunchly conservative 1st District, which stretches along along the southeastern coastline and includes both Charleston and Myrtle Beach. In 2010, he defeated councilman Paul Thurmond, son of segregationist Senator Strom Thurmond, to win the GOP’s congressional nomination. In November he won re-election with 65% of the vote. His ascension to the Senate may help the Republican Party rebrand itself after an election in which just 7% of African Americans backed Mitt Romney. The son of a single mother who worked as a nurse’s assistant, Scott clawed his way through high school and earned a partial football scholarship before becoming the wealthy part-owner of a real estate agency — the kind of bootstrapping personal narrative that conservatives believe can resonate with more middle and lower-class voters. In his remarks today, Scott praised his mom for his success. “I am thankful for a strong mom that understood that love sometimes comes at the end of a switch,” he said, according to the Washington Post.

In related news, a school board in Texas has banned the Confederate flag from Hays High School following a racial incident.

13 comments

Spielberg’s Lincoln and the Sesquicentennial

Over the weekend I took some time to answer a few questions about Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln as part of a forum for the journal Civil War History.  The roundtable discussion that will come out of it will be published in the September 2013 issue.  One of the questions focused on the movie’s connection to the sesquicentennial.  I offered a few thoughts, but one thing I noted is that we shouldn’t ignore the fact that it was filmed in Richmond and Petersburg.  It appears that both communities embraced the opportunity to host a film about Lincoln.  Of course, we can attribute much of the enthusiasm to the financial benefits that both cities enjoyed, but it is worth acknowledging that in the former capital of the Confederacy there were no major protests undertaken re: the filming of a movie about Lincoln.  Lincoln was welcomed in Richmond 150 years ago and it is nice to see that this is still the case.

The Virginia Department of Tourism has set up a website that allows visitors to trace Lincoln’s steps through Virginia.  Today I came across this collection of videos that focuses on Petersburg and vicinity, which provides visitors with even more information.

“It is altogether fitting and proper that we should this.”

2 comments

Best of 2012

KantrowitzThe end of my first full year of living in Boston and what a year it’s been.  It should come as no surprise that the highlight of the past year was the publication of my first book in June.  I’ve always loved the social aspect of doing history, whether its teaching in the classroom, working with history teachers or lecturing in public.  I’ve met some wonderful people this year and I thank each and every one of you for purchasing a copy.  Based on the few notices I’ve received from the publisher it looks like sales have been brisk.  I am hoping that my royalty check at least allows me to take my wife out for a really nice dinner next month.

As for 2013 I am looking forward to working with the Massachusetts Historical Society on some programs for teachers as well as the Massachusetts 150 Commission.  On the writing front I am hoping to complete the Confederate camp servants book and finish up with editing the letters of Captain John Christopher Winsmith.  We shall see.  For now I want to thank all of you for continuing to visit Civil War Memory.  It’s hard to believe that I’ve been at this thing called blogging for over seven years now.  Happy Holidays to you and your family.

…and now to the list.

[click to continue…]

6 comments

What Did You Read This Year?

Screen Shot 2012-11-29 at 7.14.11 AMAs I did last year I thought I might give you a chance to share what you enjoyed reading in the area of Civil War history over the past year.  It doesn’t have to have been published this past year and feel free to share something outside the field entirely if you feel moved to do so.

In the meantime here is a taste of my “Best of 2012″ list.  Even though I am only halfway through it, I am giving the Best Biography award to Jason Emerson’s, Giant in the Shadows: The Life of Robert T. Lincoln (Southern Illinois University Press, 2012).  I never thought that I would find myself engrossed by the story of Lincoln’s only son to survive to adulthood, but this is a fascinating story.  It was Spielberg’s Lincoln that drove my curiosity.  While the movie offers somewhat of a corrective to Lincoln’s relationship with his wife it offers a very traditional picture of an estranged father-son relationship.

Emerson offers a very different interpretation of this relationship, one that includes a great deal of fatherly affection.  The author also makes a convincing case that Lincoln talked seriously with his son about issues related to the war during his visits home from Harvard.   In fact, it is likely that father and son were engaged in conversation before Lincoln headed off to Ford’s Theater.  You can’t help but sympathize with Robert Todd in the period immediately following his father’s death as he was forced to assume the role of father figure to Tad and caregiver to his aggrieved and increasingly unstable mother.  On top of this he decided not to return to Harvard and instead intern at a Chicago law firm.

I knew that Robert was present at the assassination of President James Garfield and that he was in Buffalo, NY when President McKinley was shot, but I did not know that he was saved on a train platform before his father’s assassination by non-other than Edwin Booth.

This is a big book, but I promise that you will be well rewarded.

30 comments

Thanks National Park Service

215114_492365230802997_344063510_n

The above image was posted on the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County Battlefields National Military Park’s Facebook Page.  The accompanying caption reads:

We ended at a point where no Union soldier 150 yrs ago today ever reached. What a poignant end to a marvelous, powerful day. Thanks to all who came out today and followed along on Facebook. We must not forget the sacrifices that took place on these days.

I just wanted to take a second to thank all the good folks in the NPS at Fredericksburg, who have just finished up what must have been an exhausting and exhilarating week marking the momentous events that took place there 150 years ago this week.  You won’t find a more talented and passionate group of public historians.  Now get some rest because you guys are on again in five months.

1 comment