Four More Years!

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Vote!

At the risk of sounding corny I do have to say that there is something magical about taking part in a national election.  Today was my first time voting in my new home of Boston.  The scene may have been unfamiliar and the method for casting my ballot was certainly different, but there was nothing foreign about waiting in line and making small talk with others in my community.  I am as tired as the rest of you from the unending stream of commercials and phone calls, but the act of voting instantly washes all of it away.

Another feeling came over me this morning as well.  For the first time I was just a bit concerned that my name might not appear on the voter’s roll since I am new to the area.  I even imagined being turned away.  It doesn’t take much to reinforce just how important it is both as an abstract political right and as a personal value and obligation.  Finally, it reminded me of the sacrifices that so many Americans have had to take to secure this right for themselves.  In other words, get out there and vote!

p.s. Make sure you thank a poll worker for volunteering to make it all possible.

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Mark Grimsley’s Twinkie

This weekend C-SPAN aired what I think is the final session from the 2012 Civil War Institute that took place this past June.  I skipped this session for a chance to run around the battlefield with Keith Harris.  What I missed was an entertaining and informative panel on Mark Grimsley’s landmark study, The Hard Hand of War, which was the official book of the conference.  Arguably, the highlight of the panel was Megan Kate Nelson’s characterization of the book’s continued popularity as on par with the half-life of a Twinkie.  She’s right.

The Hard Hand of War was one of the first Civil War books that I read roughly fifteen years ago.  Although it is not a memory study per se, it does force readers to step back and assess assumptions about the nature and scope of violence that took place in places like Georgia and the Carolinas in 1864-65.  I agree with the panelists who point to the book’s emphasis on understanding Sherman’s March (and broader Union policy) within a broader historical context that extends back to the Middle Ages as well as the ways in which Union soldiers embraced restraint during these final campaigns as constituting its strength.

Even though the book is not light reading I always managed to include a short excerpt for my students in my Civil War elective.  I could always count on having a fruitful discussion.  Those Twinkies are looking real good right now.

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Lincoln, Obama, and Christie Show Us the Way

The decision to delay the premiere of Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln until after November 6 is a facile attempt to disassociate it from the presidential election.  It’s unavoidable and doomed to give us a skewed view not only of our own political climate, but that of the 1860s as well.  Hurricane Sandy may have caused unprecedented destruction in places like New York City and New Jersey, but for a brief moment it paved the way for what appears to be an apolitical embrace between Republican Governor Christie of New Jersey and President Obama.  Whether it is apolitical is not so important as that it is perceived by many on both sides of the aisle as a welcome respite from the usual vitriol for the purposes of aiding those in need.

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Sally Field Reflects on Mary Todd Lincoln

Like many of you I am looking forward to seeing Speilberg’s film, Lincoln.  There is quite a buzz, which I hope translates into a good showing at the box office.  As long as we don’t get carried away with critiquing the film along the narrow lines of historical accuracy we should be just fine.  I am hoping Daniel Day-Lewis presents us with a sympathetic portrayal of Lincoln that is placed within a solid historical context.  I am not looking for nor do I desire a scholarly treatment of Lincoln.  First and foremost, I want to be entertained.  I plan on writing a review for the Atlantic and I have agreed to take part in a roundtable discussion that will appear at some point in the journal, Civil War History.

I am also looking forward to seeing what Sally Field does with Mary Todd.  If anyone deserves a sympathetic treatment it’s Mary Todd and after listening to Field reflect on her character I am confident that this is just what we will see.  It would have been easy to present the popular view of an unstable woman, who caused her husband nothing but trouble.  Remember Mary Tyler Moore in the TV adaptation of Gore Vidal’s Lincoln? This is still a common theme in the Lincoln literature as well.  Back in 2007 I taught an elective on Lincoln, which included a couple of classes on Mary Todd.  Students examined a number of secondary sources including an essay by Jean H. Baker in which she offers her own interpretation of why this particular view continues to hold sway.

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