Ulysses S. Grant #POTY1863

Earlier today the Museum of the Confederacy held their symposium to determine 1863’s Person of the Year.  Most of the choices were once again predictable, though a few are just downright odd to me.  Robert Krick’s selection of Stonewall Jackson is neither surprising or interesting in any way.  I want to hear more about why Jennifer Weber believes Clement Vallindigham is so important.  Ed Ayers decided to change things up by giving a nod to the United States Colored Troops.  That makes perfect sense to me.  Here is the final tally.

Joe Glatthaar should have had it much easier by selecting Ulysses S. Grant, who is the logical choice.  Jackson coming in a close second is just downright bizarre.  And how the USCTs placed last even with a charismatic advocate like Ed Ayers is inexplicable to me.  Oh well.

I am sure everyone had a fun time, which is ultimately what this is all about.

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Gettysburg NMP Invites Trace Adkins to Sing National Anthem

Yes, I find the decision by the Gettysburg National Military Park to invite country music singer Trace Adkins to sing our National Anthem as part of the 150th anniversary commemoration of the battle to be just a little troubling.  My concern has nothing to do with the recent story about his Confederate earring and I understand that Adkins is a strong advocate for battlefield preservation.

My concern goes back to some remarks that Adkins made as part of a sesquicentennial event in Tennessee in 2010.  Here, once again, is the video from that event.

Is Adkins really the best the GNMP could do to find someone to help to bring meaning to the “cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion”?

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Don Troiani Paints a Black Union Soldier

Troiani

A number of my friends on Facebook are sharing a pic of the new release by Don Troiani.  This new watercolor of a private in the 4th United States Colored Troop is, if I am not mistaken, Troiani’s first stand alone black soldier since his 1st South Carolina Volunteer Infantry print, which was done a number of years ago.  I absolutely love it and I am very close to clicking the “Pay Now” button at my PayPal account.  Than again, my birthday is coming up soon and my wife is always looking for that perfect gift that shows her undying love for me. 🙂

Before moving to Boston I owned a fairly large collection of framed Troiani prints.  Unfortunately, I knew I wouldn’t have room in my new library/office and I couldn’t bear keeping them in the basement so I sold them.  I still have a giclee edition of “Mahone’s Charge” which is featured on the cover of my book as well as two regimental prints.

It is hard not to see this new release as a direct result of the popularity of Spielberg’s Lincoln and the broader emphasis on the history of black Union soldiers during the Sesquicentennial.   We shall see if it sells.

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Why a Monument To Forrest in Memphis in 1905?

Update: I didn’t see this one coming, but it is nice to see the SCV and NAACP working together in opposition to the Klan’s planned rally in Memphis next month.  Millar shows that he should have been included in the city’s panel to re-name Forrest Park.  Pastor Norman is quite impressive in his own right.  Last week Millar described Forrest as a “benevolent slave trader” and in his interview suggests that Forrest disbanded the Klan, which really didn’t have much to do with white supremacy to begin with.  It’s a tough sell and ultimately a losing proposition.  Regardless of how you interpret Forrest’s personal history the excerpt below clearly shows that the dedication of the monument had everything to do with Memphis’s racial climate in 1905.

A number of you have emailed me requesting additional information on the historical context of the unveiling of the Nathan Bedford Forrest memorial in Memphis in 1905.  I mentioned the other day that the best source I’ve found is Court Carney’s Journal of Southern History essay, “The Contested Image of Nathan Bedford Forrest” (August 2001).

According to Carney the Forrest memorial in Memphis can be traced to a number of factors, most importantly, the economic downturn that the city faced in the period immediately following the war and especially the yellow fever epidemic of 1878.  The epidemic hit the white community especially hard and by the end of the century African Americans had risen to constitute half of the city’s population.  The elite white population that was lost during the epidemic was replaced, according to Carney, by an influx of rural whites, who were much “less racially tolerant than their urban contemporaries.”

[click to continue…]

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“How About You and I Form a More Perfect Union”

The only thing that would have been better is if they got Daniel-Day Lewis to play the role.

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Sons of Confederate Veterans Snubbed in Memphis

ForrestToday it is being reported that a committee has been organized to determine the new name of Forrest Park and two other parks named in honor of the Confederacy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Members of the committee include:

  • Council members Bill Boyd and Harold Collins, Co-chairmen
  • Reverend Keith Norman, Sr. Pastor of First Baptist Broad, current president of the NAACP
  • Jimmy Ogle, current president of the Shelby County Historical Commission
  • Larry Smith, Deputy Director of Parks & Neighborhoods for the City of Memphis
  • Michael Robinson, Chairman of African & African American Studies, LeMoyne Owen College [website indicates that he is a professor of social work]
  • Dr. Douglas Cupples, longtime professor, Department of History, University of Memphis

As the report indicates, notably absent is any representation from the Sons of Confederate Veterans.  This is a huge mistake.  Yes, spokesmen such as Lee Millar have made some absurd claims about Forrest, but the SCV is an important stakeholder in this discussion and their perspective deserves to be heard.  The Memphis City Council should embrace every opportunity to openly discuss the relevant historical, social, and racial issues surrounding these public parks and their continued maintenance.  Keeping the SCV out of these discussions will only fuel suspicion and outrage among a certain demographic.  I for one would love to see the SCV make the case for their preferred position to the entire city of Memphis.

With this latest news it looks like the city council has taken a giant leap backward.

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An Encouraging Site

Shaw 54thI recently accompanied a group of students to Washington, D.C. to take part in a mock Congress.  With a few hours to kill I decided to take a stroll through the National Gallery of Art.  Included in the collection is a reproduction of the Shaw Memorial, which is located on Beacon Street here in Boston.  I was pleasantly surprised to find a group of students sitting with a museum teacher, who did a wonderful job of interpreting the monument and engaging the group.  The kids talked about the history of Shaw and the 54th as well as the rich symbolism contained in Saint-Gaudens’s relief.  At one point she asked the kids to share sounds that might be heard in such a scene.  It made my day.

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Walking Through Richmond in 1993

Those of you living in the Richmond area will find this documentary to be particularly interesting.  In 1993 the city organized Healing the Heart of America, which among other things included a walk through Richmond in an attempt to address lingering tensions over slavery, race, and history.  Some of the interviews are quite interesting.  You can see the legacy of this walk in such programs as The Future of Richmond’s Past as well as the incredible work of Virginia’s Sesquicentennial Commission.  It is interesting to see the changes to the city’s commemorative landscape in the last twenty years.

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