Not Your Grandfather’s Civil War Commemoration

Last month I gave a talk to the Rhode Island Civil War Round Table in which I offered an assessment of the first full year of the Civil War Sesquicentennial celebrations and commemoration.  I decided to work on it a bit more and I am pleased to share it with you in The Atlantic.  It looks like I will be writing for The Atlantic on a fairly regular basis as long as my schedule can accommodate it.  Last week’s review of the Gingrich novel was a huge success.  It led to an interview on public radio, but most importantly, it is connecting me to a much broader audience.  Thanks again to Jenni Rothenberg at The Atlantic, who has been an absolute pleasure to work with.

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Zonation on the Confederate Flag

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The Future of Comments at Civil War Memory

I truly appreciate that so many of you not only take the time to read this blog, but leave comments as well.  You leave a lot of comments.  All comments are moderated by me and I do my best to approve them as quickly as possible.  I also do my best to respond to as many as possible.  I may not go into great detail with my responses, but it is important to me to acknowledge your contribution to the site.  Fortunately, I spend most of my day in front of the computer, but over the past few weeks I have been bombarded with comments.  Something has to give.

While many of the threads function as a natural extension of the post more and more are moving much too far beyond the content of the post and in some cases involve nothing more than the hurling of mild insults back and forth.  I am even growing impatient with certain contributors and I don’t like how it feels.  I think what I need to do is find a happy medium between letting go of the discussion and directing it through the moderating tools that I have at my disposal.  Don’t be surprised if I disable the comments feature every once in a while on individual posts and don’t expect that your comments will be approved right away if things begin to deteriorate between individual contributors.  Perhaps a cooling off period will help.

Like I said, I thoroughly enjoy taking the time to read your comments.  Thanks for your understanding.

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The Suffering of War and Heat of Reunion

Yes, it’s a slow day here at Civil War Memory.  Not all of the credits that I earn as an Amazon affiliate go to purchasing the latest Civil War scholarship.  I don’t read much Civil War fiction, but when I do I like to curl up with a book that reminds me of the war’s pain and suffering and the joys heat of reunion. From Land of the Falling Stars:

Penniless, her parents and brother dead, Sophia Whitfield struggles to save her beloved childhood home during the Civil War. Another bluecoat is staggering down the hill, but before Sophia allows him to rob and pilfer like the others, she shoots him. How is she to know it is Gavin, the dark knight of her youth, carrying secrets too horrific to imagine and a passion that ignites her deepest desires? As Sophia gradually learns Gavin’s secrets—and enjoys his talents in the bedroom—she discovers how to finally know her own heart. Can she save the Land of Falling Stars, or will she lose it all to the horrors of the War and Reconstruction? And will the Southern lady and the Yankee soldier be able to recapture the bliss of their youth—this time in each other’s arms?

Enjoy.

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How Does Confederate History Mesh With Black History?

The following documentary by filmmaker Shukree Tilghman will air on New Hampshire Public Television on February 12, 2012.  It looks to be pretty interesting.  Watch the trailer for some truly bizarre claims made by the Sons of Confederate Veterans.  My personal favorite: “After the war there was a major move to squash Confederate history.”  Only someone completely ignorant to the trajectory of Civil War memory could make such a ridiculous claim.

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