March to the C

I think you are going to like this.

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Memory and History at Ground Zero

There is a wonderful article in yesterday’s New York Times on the challenges of commemorating and interpreting the tragedy of 9-11 at “Ground Zero” in Manhattan.  Back in January I wrote on some of the parallels between 9-11 and Civil War memory at the Atlantic.  As someone interested in public history and interpretation and as a family member of a 9-11 victim I certainly appreciate the competing interests and emotional investment that animate many in this debate.

  • How should the terrorists be interpreted in the museum?
  • What should be done with the remains of 9-11 victims and how should they be memorialized?
  • How much influence should 9-11 families have on interpretation?
  • What artifacts should be included in the museum?
  • How should the politics of 9-11 be handled, including subsequent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq?

There are no easy answers nor should there be at this stage.  I was struck by the issue of how to handle the most emotionally sensitive materials such as voice recordings and images.  The designers of the museum have sectioned off certain exhibits and made it possible for visitors to exit at certain points if the experience becomes too much.  As someone who is personally invested in this story I can appreciate the steps taken here, but the historian in me is concerned.

If we are going this far to protect visitors from certain sights and sounds than perhaps it is too soon to even consider a museum.  Perhaps the site should remain a memorial for the near future and perhaps the museum would have been better placed in NYC, but away from Ground Zero.  The people in charge of interpreting the site may have achieved a certain level of detachment, but the general public may still be far behind.

Just a few thoughts.

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Restoring Charles Hoffbauer’s “Four Seasons of the Confederacy”

No trip to the Virginia Historical Society is complete without a visit to Charles Hoffbauer’s beautiful murals.  Click here for more information about the restoration and the history of the murals.

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Black Petersburg Remembers the Crater

File this one under the ‘better late than never’ category.  I guess every historian has experienced uncovering a gem of a reference that failed to make it into a published work.  The following editorial (“Our Colored Militia”) was published in the Petersburg Lancet on September 12, 1885 by George F. Bragg, Jr. on the occasion of a local black militia parade.

When we think of the achievements  of those brilliant knights of the middle ages; when we think of the christian armies moving onwards to Jerusalem to wrest the tomb of the blessed Saviour from the fierce barbaric hands of Saracenic hosts; when we remember the courageous conduct of the Negro troops at Fort Fisher, Fort Wagner, at New Orleans and at the CRATER near our own city, in which the limbs of may of our brethren in black lie mouldering in the dust from which they came, we may feel that this gathering to day is not an idle insignificant one, but that the colored militia men of this grand old State have determined to perpetuate the memories of that institution from which so many healthy lasting benefits have been derived.

There were a number of black militias active throughout Virginia during the postwar period.  Though their service was limited they performed an important function within the local black community by reinforcing civic pride and preserving a memory of the war that was slowly losing its hold on the public’s imagination by the late nineteenth century.  This editorial reinforces just how important it was for African Americans to keep alive the memory of their service and sacrifice in the war as a way to maintain what limited freedoms they enjoyed, especially in the wake of the end of Readjuster control of the state.

One of the topics that I briefly explore in the book is the challenge of connecting black residents of Petersburg to the history at the Crater.  Earlier this week I posted on a parade in Fredericksburg that recreates the postwar participation of local blacks in decorating and honoring Union graves.  If repeated it at least has the potential to connect a certain segment of the community to the Civil War past and its continued relevance.  Perhaps the recreation of a black militia march in Petersburg with their overt references to black participation in the war can achieve similar ends.  Just a thought.

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Almost Moved to Tears in Fredericksburg, Virginia

I am delighted to hear that residents of Fredericksburg, Virginia have resurrected a civic ceremony that was lost as a result of reunion between white Northern and former Confederates.  For a number of years after the war the black residents of the city took part in annual marches on Decoration Day to the cemetery to commemorate the bravery of United States soldiers and the cause for which they fought.  Those early commemorations constituted a living reminder that the war had profound results for millions of slaves and that its memory would be incomplete without the acknowledgment of emancipation and freedom.

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