“Let Me Explain Something To You”

This young man seems to be quite convinced that the war was not about slavery.  I am going to have to go back and review everything I’ve read.  Warning: This video contains profanity.

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Should These Men Be Prevented From Serving on Juries?

confederate

Update: Leave it to Ta-Nehisi Coates to remind us of just how silly this project actually is.

Anti-Neo-Confederate crusader Edward Sebesta is best known for his push to petition President Obama to cease sending a wreath to the Confederate memorial at Arlington as well as his claim that the Museum of the Confederacy is mired in Lost Cause nostalgia.  Now Sebesta and Euan Hague are hoping to rid juries of racial bias by identifying Confederate/Lost Cause bias among potential jurors[click to continue…]

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Father’s Flag

What follows is James Southard’s interpretation of his video.  [click to continue…]

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Not A Single Former Slave Involuntarily Removed

Here is something to think about from James Oakes’s Freedom National: The Destruction of Slavery in the United States, 1861-1865.

It is not hard to understand the flurry of support for colonization during the Civil War.  Notwithstanding the opposition of radical abolitionists, colonization presupposed emancipation, and whenever talk of emancipation arose, so too did talk of colonization.  The more difficult question to answer is why it came to so little.  In the modern world, wars of unification, especially civil wars inflamed by ethnic nationalism, commonly lead to forced population transfers and sometimes genocide.  The Civil War in the United States was certainly a war of national unification, and the Republicans exhibited more than their fare share of ethnic nationalism.  Nor was the idea of forced expulsion unheard of in the United States.  Most Republican policymakers were old enough to remember the brutal “removal” of the southeastern Indians during Andrew Jackson’s administration.  And during the Civil War itself the Union army forcibly expelled some ten thousand whites from their homes in Missouri.  The same army systematically uprooted tens of thousands of slaves from their plantations to relocate them in areas safe from the reach of their former masters.  And yet not a single emancipated slave was involuntarily “removed” from the United States in the wake of emancipation. (p. 281)

Oakes goes on to suggest an explanation, but for now I am going to leave you with just the excerpt.

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What More Needs To Be Said About Gettysburg?

Gettysburg…apparently very little.

With the Future of Civil War History conference right around the corner it should come as no surprise that I’ve had Gettysburg on my mind.  I am also looking forward to a return visit in June for the annual Civil War Institute, which will focus on the battle of Gettysburg.  With the 150th anniversary just a few months away you would think that publishers would want to cash in on the general public’s interest in this specific battle.  It goes without saying that no other Civil War battle looms larger in the nation’s collective memory.

Surprisingly, however, there is very little that is slated for publication this summer.  In fact, the only full length treatment seems to be Allen Guelzo’s Gettysburg: The Last Invasion.  Brooks Simpson offers a much more concise overview of the battle in his, Gettysburg, 1863 and for those looking for a detailed study of Confederate action on July 2 there is Philip Thomas Tucker’s BARKSDALE’S CHARGE: The True High Tide of the Confederacy at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863.  And that’s about it folks.

I really thought that the major publishers, in addition to Knopf, would find some way to squeeze something out of the 150th.  Perhaps I have overlooked additional titles.  If not, have we hit a wall?

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