Acquisitions, 08/19

Adam Arenson, The Great Heart of the Republic: St. Louis and the Cultural Civil War (Harvard University Press, 2011).

Karen Cox, Dreaming of Dixie: How the South Was Created in American Popular Culture, (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Anthony J. Gaughan, The Last Battle of the Civil War: United States Versus Lee, 1861-1883 (Louisiana State University Press, 2011).

Mark Neely, Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Cathy Stanton, The Lowell Experiment: Public History in a Postindustrial City (University of Massachusetts Press, 2006).

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Abraham Lincoln by Chingo Bling

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Then And Now In Stone Mountain, Georgia

It’s an unusual form of Civil War remembrance, but the idea of a sculpture in the shape of a “Sherman’s necktie” opens up a number of avenues of interpretation.  It raises issues related to the physical destruction and displacement of civilians that Sherman’s men wrought.  The twisted rail also functions as a metaphor for change and the coming of emancipation in the heart of Georgia.  Of course, any discussion of emancipation also needs to deal with some of the hardships that freed slaves faced as they followed the army to the coast.  I think it’s an incredibly simple and yet creative piece.  Unfortunately, I was unable to locate any of the addresses that marked the sculpture’s unveiling.

What do you think?

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It’s Never Too Late To Reconcile

Here is an interesting story from my neck of the woods.  The Worcester Grand Army of the Republic Board of Trustees voted recently to return three captured Confederate flags to the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City, N.C. The flags were captured at the Battle of New Bern, in North Carolina on March 14, 1862, by two Union divisions manned with residents of Central Massachusetts. This latest story follows a much longer trend of reconciliation gestures between the descendants of Civil War veterans.  [I will be speaking at the North Worcester County Civil War Roundtable on October 11.]

This past Friday I spent a pleasant afternoon at the Framingham History Center located in the Edgell Memorial Library, which was built after the war to honor Union veterans. The center’s director, Annie Murphy, was kind enough to give me a personal tour of their new Civil War exhibit.  It’s not the most elaborate exhibit around, but they do a nice job of highlighting was is clearly an extensive collection of artifacts and documents.  It includes General George H. Gordon’s coat, a buts of the general sculpted by Daniel Chester French and a battle worn flag of the 13th Massachusetts.  If you are in the area you should make it a point to check it out.

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Under Construction

Just a quick note for those of you who may have been just a bit confused when logging onto Civil War Memory today.  You will notice that the blog is no longer the default landing page.  I am beginning to think of Civil War Memory as more than just a blog.  It’s still the core of the site, but you will notice that I created a page for my forthcoming book on the Crater and I hope at some point soon to create a page for some of my favorite classroom lesson plans.  I want this site to be a resource for k-12 history teachers and others in the field.  It should also more effectively reflect my own work as a teacher, public speaker, and historian.

I am still in the beginning stages of thinking through this shift in focus so be prepared for continuous changes to the site and perhaps a few breakdowns.  Of course, I would love to hand this project over to a professional, but I simply do not have the funds for it, so I will rely on my own meager web skills.

Feel free to offer suggestions.

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