What Did You Read This Year?

Oxford University Press

I am beginning to think about my “Best of 2011″ list, which will be published at the end of the month.  A few of the titles that are likely to be included were recently highlighted as part of a best of list that can be found in the most recent issue of The Civil War Monitor.  I had plenty of time to read this year, which has made this year’s list much more difficult to nail down.

With Christmas fast approaching I wanted to thank those of you who have purchased books from Amazon by clicking through my affiliate link in the sidebar.  As many of you know, I make a small percentage on each sale and thus far I’ve done fairly well.  For the past four quarters I was able to purchase anywhere between 3-5 hardcover books.  I just started my latest acquisition, which is Paul Quigley’s, Shifting Grounds: Nationalism & the American South, 1848-1865 (Oxford University Press, 2011).

Enough about what I’ve read.  What did you read this year that you can recommend?  Of course, I am interested in Civil War books, but please feel free to share anything that you think is worth spending some time with.  Thanks.

Can North & South Magazine Be Salvaged?

From the North & South Website

I was surprised to see an advertisement for North and South magazine in the latest issue of Hallowed Ground that included a special discount to new subscribers.  Keith Poulter has a brand new website up, which suggests that he is trying to bring back to life what was once a first-rate publication.  Unfortunately, those days have long passed.  It is true that when the magazine hit the newsstands back in 1997, it set a new standard for what a popular history publication could be.  It regularly attracted some of the top scholars in the field and introduced aspects of the war that had never made it into a popular magazine format.

Looking back it is clear that the most important asset on Poulter’s staff was Terry Johnston and he has just launched The Civil War Monitor, which I strongly encourage you to consider.  My N&S subscription recently expired and I have no intention of renewing it, not simply because of the way I was handled as an author, but more importantly because of the declining quality of the content.  Perhaps I am being unnecessarily critical, but in this economy consumers deserve information with which to base a decision and I am certainly not the first person to raise concerns.  For me it was an investment that went sour and that alone deserves to be made known. I am very happy with The Civil War Monitor and as an author and reader I couldn’t be more pleased with Civil War Times.

We shall see whether Poulter can salvage his magazine.

Appearance on Studio 360

Update: The interview went well and should air this weekend. Thanks to those of you who left comments or emailed me. I am disappointed that Newt didn’t call in. Oh well.

This morning I will be a guest on Studio 360 with Kurt Anderson to discuss my review of Newt Gingrich’s Civil War novel, The Battle of the Crater.  The interview is at 10am, but if I heard correctly it will not air live – perhaps over the weekend.  Of course, I will share the podcast once it appears on their website.  It should be fun.

For those of you up early perhaps you can help me with a short list of politicians who have dabbled in history.  I am interested primarily, but not exclusively in the Civil War era.  Woodrow Wilson comes to mind in the context of the Civil War and, of course, there is Kennedy’s Profiles in Courage.  More recent examples are very much appreciated.  Thanks for your help.

Joan Waugh’s 2011 Fortenbaugh Lecture at Gettysburg College

On November 19, Professor Joan Waugh delivered the 2011 Fortenbaugh Lecture at the Majestic Theater in Gettysburg.  Professor Waugh’s lecture, “‘The Rebels Are Our Countrymen Again’: U.S. Grant and the Meaning of Appomattox” reexamines the familiar story of the historic surrender of Confederate forces to Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia. The surrender at Appomattox is generally considered the end of the American Civil War, enshrining a powerful image of a peaceful, perfectly conducted closure to the bloody conflict. Yet the details of Grant’s magnanimous surrender document provoked debate, anger, and opposition among the Northern public. This mixed reception casts doubt on Appomattox as a shining moment of reunion and reconciliation, predicting the troubles that lay ahead for President Grant and the country in the postwar era.

A Response To Edward Sebesta

Back in September I responded to the first part of a multi-post essay by Edward Sebesta concerning the Museum of the Confederacy.  A few weeks back Sebesta responded on his blog.  I admit that characterizing Sebesta’s essay as a “rant” was a poor choice of words, but I maintain that it is a poorly researched essay.  The fundamental problem with his essay can be seen in a NYTs review of the museum by Edward Rothstein:

But if there is any success in the reconciliation of regional history and national history, it will not come easily. The Museum of the Confederacy embodies the conflict in its very origins; its artifacts were accumulated in the midst of grief. The museum’s first solicitation for donations, in 1892, four years before its opening, is telling: “The glory, the hardships, the heroism of the war were a noble heritage for our children. To keep green such memories and to commemorate such virtues, it is our purpose to gather together and preserve in the Executive Mansion of the Confederacy the sacred relics of those glorious days. We appeal to our sisters throughout the South to help us secure these invaluable mementoes before it’s too late.”

That heritage casts a long shadow over the institution. When I visited in 2008, slavery still seemed an inconsequential part of Southern history. And Southern suffering loomed large.

But changes have been taking place. Several tendentious text panels (in one, Lincoln was portrayed as having manipulated the South into starting the war) have been removed. And gradually, under the presidency of S. Waite Rawls III, the museum, while keeping its name, has been expanding its ambitions, trying to turn its specialization into a strength instead of a burden.

Satellite museums are being planned at other Civil War sites in Virginia. The museum’s scholarly resources are being promoted, and nostalgic trappings are being shed. Some of the institution’s tours focus on traditional subjects like Confederate foreign policy, but others examine relationships between free and enslaved blacks in Civil War Richmond, or discuss the lives of servants in the Confederate White House.

Rothstein nails in four paragraphs what Sebesta is no closer to understanding in a 4-part essay and that is that any evaluation of the MOC must be sensitive to its unique history, first as shrine to the Confederacy and more recently as a museum.  Admittedly, the line between a shrine and a museum is blurry and what lessons one walks away with will depend on a whole host of factors.  What is difficult to dispute, however, is that the MOC has undergone significant changes over the past few decades and that its evolution continues right through the sesquicentennial.

Unfortunately, there is no indication that Sebesta has ever visited the MOC or that he has taken the time to interview some of the people mentioned such as John Coski and Waite Rawls III.  I have no doubt that Sebesta would have learned quite a bit by sitting down with the museum staff to learn about how they work to satisfy the expectations of various segments of its broader community.  In addition, while Sebesta is fond of quoting his favorite “neo-Confederate” sources he never comes to terms with the fact that the scholarly community has embraced the MOC.  The museum’s reflection of recent scholarship can be seen in both the books that they give prizes to as well as the quality of recent exhibits.

As I said in my initial post, a study of the MOC as it relates to public history and historical memory would make for a fascinating dissertation and/or book.  However, such a careful study is impossible to undertake when your paramount goal is to uncover “neo-Confederates” at every turn.