The Blogging World Just Got a Little More Bad Ass

honey-badger

The Honey Badger

A big welcome to my good friend, Megan Kate Nelson, who earlier today unveiled her website, Historista. Megan has been talking for some time about diving into the blogosphere and given her recent career move now is the perfect time. In her inaugural post Megan explores some creepy connections between two books with the same title, one about John Brown and the other about vampires. Check it out. I couldn’t be happier that Megan has made this move. She is a dynamite writer and has a wonderful sense of humor. Congratulations, Megan! [click to continue…]

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“The Second Battle of Gettysburg”

My first visit to Gettysburg came after the destruction of the National Tower on July 3, 2000. I was reminded of it earlier today while reading Jen Murray’s, On a Great Battlefield: The Making, Management, and Memory of Gettysburg National Military Park, 1933-2012. Jen does a fabulous job of exploring the controversy surrounding the construction of the tower and more recent interpretive and preservation challenges on the battlefield. [click to continue…]

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Pic of the Day, 06/28

I thought I would share this photograph given that the Supreme Court was in the news this week. This billboard was sponsored by the John Birch Society and unlike many of their billboards this one includes a Confederate flag. Also interesting to note the reference to Belmont, Massachusetts.

Impeach Earl Warren

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Scrapping Gettysburg’s Virginia Memorial

Jen Murray’s new book, On a Great Battlefield: The Making, Management, and Memory of Gettysburg National Military Park, 1933-2012, is full of surprises. Yesterday I shared a paragraph from Jen’s book on a plan to hide some of the battlefield monuments with shrubs and other vegetation. [click to continue…]

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Gettysburg’s Civil War Monuments “Merely Exist”

I love exploring the many monuments on the Gettysburg battlefield. While they were intended to commemorate the events that took place in July 1863, the monuments ultimately tell us much more about how the veterans and Americans decades later chose to remember their actions and the broader meaning of the war. [click to continue…]

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