Preserving Black History On Their Own Terms

I get a real kick out of the good folks over at the Southern Heritage Preservation site.  They spend a great deal of time calling for the preservation of African-American history by pushing the black Confederate narrative, but when a black man disagrees with their preferred view of the war all bets are off.  Consider this little give and take over an editorial written by Tony Norman for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  The editorial is par for the course compared with most editorials written this year.  Norman places too much weight on recent polls and completely ignores the dramatic changes that can be seen in recent Civil War commemorations and the overall public dialog.  That hasn’t prevented the folks at SHP from going for the jugular.  For people who are committed to preserving black history they sure don’t have much patience for black people.

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It’s Not Such a Divisive Topic

My talk last night in Roanoke on Silas Chandler and black Confederates went very well.  Of course, I heard that a phone call had notified organizers that a protest was likely, but it never materialized.  In fact, the audience was attentive and they asked some excellent questions during the Q&A.  It’s easy to exaggerate the significance of that small, but vocal group of partisans who clearly have an emotional stake in this “debate” rather than an intellectual or scholarly interest in this subject.  Last night reminded me that there is a general public that is curious about this subject, but doesn’t quite know what to make of it.  Many in the audience had heard about the Virginia textbook scandal from last year.  What I love about this topic is that it gives me the opportunity to educate the general public about a widely misunderstood topic as well as the dangers of doing research Online.

By focusing on Silas Chandler I am able to steer clear of the numbers game and address more important aspects of the discussion, including the problem of utilizing Internet sources.  Most importantly, by poking holes in the standard account of Silas, which pervades the Web, I can demonstrate what is wrong with the state of this discussion in its entirety.  Silas really is the poster boy of this subject.

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Gone With the Wind’s Black Confederates… I Mean Loyal Slaves

I am putting the finishing touches on my presentation for tomorrow evening at the Western Virginia Historical Society in Roanoke.  One of the points that I want to stress is that the black Confederate reference is relatively new to our cultural lexicon.  As I’ve suggested before, references to hundreds or even thousands of loyal slaves serving as soldiers in the Confederate army can be traced to the period following the movie, Glory in 1989.  Despite the insistence on the part of a small, but vocal group black Confederate soldiers simply did not exist in our collective memory until recently.  We have already discussed the case of the Confederate monument at Arlington, which was dedicated in 1914 [and here].  Primary source material related to the dedication ceremony as well as early histories of the site clearly references the image of the black man following soldiers into battle as a body servant (slave).  To insist otherwise is to engage in presentism.

It may be helpful to consider a scene in Gone With the Wind that features just the kind of image that is so often misrepresented today.  During the evacuation of Atlanta and amidst all of the confusion of Federal shells and runaway carriages Scarlett happens upon former slaves from Tara, including “Big Sam”.  He reassures Scarlett: “[T]he Confederacy needs it, so we is going to dig for the South…. [D]on’t worry we’ll stop them Yankees.”

Let’s put aside for now the overt imagery to loyal slaves that is pervasive throughout the movie.  What is worth pointing out is that no one describes these men as soldiers and it is unlikely that moviegoers would have made this assumption as well.  They would have viewed these men simply as loyal slaves to the South.  More specifically, it looks like these men functioned as slaves impressed by the Confederate government.

In the hands of the careless they are whatever you want them to be.

A Balanced Report On the Sesquicentennial

Thanks to CBS’s “Sunday Morning” show for producing one of the most balanced accounts of the Civil War Sesquicentennial that I’ve seen in some time. Not only was it thoughtful, but it managed to include a number of important perspectives without taking on the loaded question of why and how we are still fighting the Civil War. Click here for one of the worst examples of this style of reporting out of England.