Rotov Reviews Glatthaar’s Numbers Crunching

Dimitri Rotov has a fiery post up that evaluates Joseph Glatthaar’s recent scholarship – specifically his use of statistical analysis in his recent studies.  It’s a worthwhile read, though Rotov chose to embeds his analysis in his vaguely-defined “Centennialist” school paradigm.  He begins with this little gem:

“Joseph T. Glatthaar is an early middle-aged Centennialist being groomed by Gary Gallagher to walk in the shoes of himself, Sears, McPherson, and the old storytellers – Williams, Williams, Catton, etc.”

I’m sure Glatthaar would find such an evaluation of his career as laughable, but this sort of critique is standard in Rotov’s arsenal.  In the end, it fails to shed any light at all on Glatthaar’s scholarship.  We do get closer to a formal critique re: Glatthaar’s citing of casualty figures in General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse.  Rotov begins by taking Glatthaar to task for his imprecise citation of casualty figures and his failure to utilize Thomas Livermore’s Numbers and Losses.  Rotov didn’t bother to look up Glatthaar’s references for his Cedar Creek Mountain, but it only takes a few seconds to learn that they were pulled out of one of the appendices in Robert K. Krick’s, Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain.  It’s not clear to me what exactly is problematic with citing one of the authorities on this particular battle.

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Black Confederates at the ASALH

This morning I learned that I will be speaking on the subject of black Confederates at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, which will take place in Richmond in October.  Thanks to National Park Service Ranger, Emmanuel Dabney, for putting together an excellent panel that will offer different perspectives on this subject.  Proponents of this myth, who rush to cite Ervin Jordan as a supporter, ought to carefully read his session description.

It ought to be a well-attended session and the discussion will, no doubt, be entertaining.  The conference as a whole promises to be quite interesting given that the theme is the Civil War and the Sesquicentennial.  We don’t have a specific time for the session, but I will be sure to pass it on as more information becomes available.

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Acquisitions, 05/27

I am reading David Blight’s new book on the Civil War Centennial in which he analyzes the writings of Bruce Catton.  While I’ve read chunks of Catton in the past I am embarrassed to admit that I’ve never actually read one of his books from cover to cover.  Well, I just started A Stillness at Appomattox and I can’t put it down.  He was one hell of a writer.

David W. Blight, American Oracle: The Civil War in the Civil Rights Era (Harvard University Press, 2011).

E. Renee Ingram, In View of the Great Want of Labor: A Legislative History of African American Conscription in the Confederacy (Willow Bend Books, 2002).

Brian D. McKnight, Confederate Outlaw: Champ Ferguson and the Civil War in Appalachia(Louisiana State University Press, 2011).

James Marten, Sing Not War: The Lives of Union and Confederate Veterans in Gilded Age America (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Timothy S. Sedore, An Illustrated Guide to Virginia’s Confederate Monuments (Southern Illinois University Press, 2011).

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People Want To Be Free

[Hat-tip to Donald Schaffer]

I don’t have much patience for the long-standing debate of who freed the slaves.  The question itself is much too simplistic and sterile.  Why historians have felt a need to single out one factor or engage in wholesale reductionism, in the end, tells us much more about the assumptions we employ than about the complexity of the story of emancipation that needs to be told.  Today is the 150th anniversary of General Benjamin Butler’s letter informing his superiors of three escaped slaves who had made their way to Fortress Monroe.

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Harry Smeltzer, Blogging, and Civil War History

Today I received the latest issue of the journal, Civil War History, which includes a roundtable discussion about the First Battle of Bull Run.  The panelists include John Hennessy, Ethan Rafuse, and fellow blogger, Harry Smeltzer.  [I should point out that both Rafuse and Hennessy manage blogs, but they have published on the battle while it is his blog that singles Harry out as an authority.]  Lesley Gordon’s vision for the journal is beginning to take shape and I couldn’t be more pleased that she is inviting folks from outside the community of academic historians to take part.  The choice to include Harry, whose blog is about First Bull Run, suggests that blogging has the potential to open new doors for those who demonstrate competency in their preferred subject area.  I don’t think it would be a stretch to suggest that what we have before us is an example of peer review.

Most Civil War bloggers do a good job of expressing their passion for the subject.  Very few actually add to our understanding of the Civil War and this is just fine.  The beauty of the format is that one can blog for any reason whatsoever, but it is always nice to see when the hard work leads to new opportunities.

Congratulations, Harry.

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