“Grant Can Not Continue as He Has Been Doing Much Longer”

On this day 150 years ago Captain John Christopher Winsmith of the 1st South Carolina Infantry penned the following letter to his mother back in Spartanburg, South Carolina. It reflects a good deal of pessimism about the state of the Union army, Grant’s leadership, and morale on the Northern home front. Winsmith, like many Confederates at this time, continued to believe that victory was possible through the summer of 1864 if each man performed his duty. Interesting to note that Winsmith shares that the men in his unit were “well supplied with rations” at this late stage in the war in contrast with the popular image of starving Confederates. After the loss of Winsmith’s body servant, Spencer, in the summer of 1862 he was replaced by Miles, who remained with him until the end of his military career in October 1864. [click to continue…]

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Does a Confederate Flag Belong in a House of Worship?

The Confederate flag is back in the news this past week as Charleston County Councilman, Henry Darby, called for the removal of the flag from the chapel at The Citadel. It is unclear whether the recent controversy surrounding the display of the flag at W&L’s Lee Chapel had any influence on Darby’s decision. [click to continue…]

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Confederate Desertion and PFC Bowe Bergdahl

USA_PFC_BoweBergdahl_ACU_CroppedOne of the essays that I wrote in graduate school at the University of Richmond was on desertion in the Confederate army. I published a short version of the piece in Civil War Times, which you can read here and I am hoping to publish a longer and more analytical version somewhere in the near future. My interest was with those deserters who were tried and executed and specifically with how their comrades responded. As many of you know these executions were public events meant to influence the behavior and resolve of the hundreds and even thousands who often were ordered to attend.

What struck me was the overwhelming support that these executions had within the ranks. Soldiers understood that discipline and unit cohesion was paramount to the survival of the army and that unchecked desertion would ultimately lead to defeat. But even though there was widespread support for executions soldiers expressed sympathy for the condemned. Soldiers understood many of the forces influencing their comrades’ decisions to desert and on occasion acknowledged that they could just as easily be facing the firing squad. The ease with which men sympathized with one another, no doubt, reflected their experiential common ground. [click to continue…]

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Ron Maxwell’s Kickstarter Campaign Canceled

You could tell from the beginning that this campaign was doomed to fail. It wasn’t at all clear how the money raised would be used, not to mention what the final product would look like. Crowdfunding demands a good deal of research, especially when the goal is a quarter of a million dollars, but most importantly it calls for a certain amount of respect for the community from which the funds are to be raised.

Ron Maxwell Kickstarter Canceled

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The Emotional Pull of Cold Harbor

Those of us who have spent significant time walking Civil War battlefields know that they evoke different emotions. Much of that is the result of the broader narrative that we bring to these sites. I was reminded of this yesterday as I was writing the post on Cold Harbor and as a result of following the comments. The Cold Harbor battlefield invokes in me a feeling of dread and anxiousness that I rarely feel on other battlefields. Perhaps it’s the name or some feint memory of the voices of David McCullough and Shelby Foote from Ken Burns’s The Civil War that triggers it. [click to continue…]

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