Upcoming Talk on Black Confederates + Appearance on History Detectives

I couldn’t be more excited about this talk.  This is my first public presentation on the subject and my first opportunity to formally outline my own thinking about the kinds of questions that need to be explored as well as the pitfalls involved in the current debate and reliance on the Internet as a reliable source.  The story of Silas and Andrew Chandler is the perfect case study for such a presentation.

I am also excited to announce that I will be involved in a production of an upcoming episode of the History Detectives, which will explore the life of these two men.  You may remember that the Antiques Road Show recently featured the original photograph of Silas and Andrew.  A number of people, including yours truly, raised serious questions about Wes Cowan’s interrogation of the artifact as well as his overall understanding of the subject.  It’s good to see that PBS is taking the time to dig deeper.  Filming will take place in May and I will keep you updated.

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Acquisitions, 04/20

I did my best to dump as many books as possible in light of my move to Boston at the end of June, but new titles just continue to pour in.  In addition to recent review copies, I’ve listed some books that I am reading to brush up on my Massachusetts/Boston history.  I can’t wait to explore the incredibly rich history in and around the city.  Thanks to those of you who are purchasing Amazon books through Civil War Memory.  Sales have been steady, which has allowed me to purchase what I need without having to dip into my own pockets.  I truly appreciate it.

Barbara A. Gannon, The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Gary W. Gallagher, The Union War (Harvard University Press, 2011).

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Do Civil War Re-enactors Not Order Domino’s Pizza?

I missed having the opportunity to comment on this story last week.  First, let me say that I couldn’t be more pleased that developers will be prevented from building a casino at Gettysburg.  That said, I’ve always thought that the battlefield preservation debate is best understood as a negotiation between legitimate competing interests rather than a moral crusade.  Gregg Segal’s photography project in which he situates re-enactors in various scenes of urban sprawl is perhaps the most extreme example of this tendency to offer a mutually exclusive choice between preservation and commercial development.

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Welcome Encyclopedia Virginia

With the addition of the VFH’s Encyclopedia Virginia to my list of advertisers I’ve sold just about every ad space available apart from two 125×125 slots in the right sidebar. EV is the most reliable online encyclopedia for Virginia history and it is still a work-in-progress. The Civil War selections are under the editorial supervision of Peter Carmichael of Gettysburg College. You should also check out the EV companion blog as well as their page devoted to the Civil War Sesquicentennial.

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Looking Ahead to the Civil War Bicentennial

If you are looking for a reflection of how our collective understanding of the Civil War has changed over the past few years take a look at this small sample of state SOLs.   I suspect that we will continue to see a shift away from a curriculum that is inspired and sometimes distorted by the Lost Cause in the coming decades.  Interestingly, if you are looking for some of the most dramatic changes you just need to check out the following list of Southern states.  I pulled this from an article written by Eric Robelon for Education Week.

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