Can the NAACP Get Right With the Civil War Sesquicentennial?

NAACP Protest in Charleston, SC, December 2010

In a recent post, Ta-Nehisis Coates is critical of the NAACP for its continued boycott of South Carolina as well as its struggle to remove the Confederate flag from state house grounds.  I couldn’t agree more with Coates:

There is something that really strikes me as wrong about urging people to not visit South Carolina on the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. I was listening to the radio a few days ago, and the mayor of Charleston was discussing the significance of the city’s slave ports in American history. I haven’t seen this on paper, but he claimed something like 20 percent of all African-American have an ancestor that came through Charleston. Whether that’s true, or not, you’re talking about a state with a unique place in black history, in particular, and American history at large…. At some point we have to stop telling people what they can’t believe in, and start telling them what they can. At some point we have push a positive view of history, not in the sense of white-washing, but in the sense of something beyond debunking. I don’t know that you can banish the Confederate flag from the South. I don’t know that you can make Tennessee come to terms with Nathan Bedford Forrest. But surely you can shine a light on Ida B Wells, Prince Rivers, Cassius Clay and Elizabeth Van Lew.

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How Does This Fit Into the Lost Cause?

Update from a Reliable Source: “One porn catalog mailed out to the Army of the Potomac advertised dildoes. A dildo was found in the wall of a house of a Nantucket captain’s widow. The first vibrator was marketed in 1870. The traveling device salesman sounds perfectly plausible.”

I Guess She Didn't Need Him After All

I just wrapped up a wonderful visit with a former student from Alabama that I have not seen in ten years.  It’s always nice to see how these kids turn out.  Anyway, this student comes from a fairly prominent Alabama family with its share of family stories.  One of those stories struck me as very interesting and I am curious if anyone can recommend further reading.

It turns out that this woman’s great grandfather supplied southern widows with adult novelties in the wake of the Civil War.  I know, I know…this is not something we want to acknowledge at least for those of us who harbor conservative views of women or images of Melanie Hamilton.  It turns out that this drastic change in profession eventually cost him his marriage.  The story has stayed within the confines of the family for the obvious reasons and I have no reason not to believe it, but I am curious if anyone has done serious research on this aspect of widowhood.  I am familiar with Thomas Lowry’s book, but I don’t believe he addresses this.

Given Victorian attitudes toward sex I assume that evidence of such a market would be hard to come by.  What do you think?

Stacy D. Allen Responds

This afternoon I received a response from Stacy D. Allen, who is the Chief Ranger at Shiloh National Military Park, regarding their photo exhibit on Andrew and Silas Chandler.  As I indicated in the post I never had any doubt that I would receive a response as well as an indication that the necessary changes would be made.

We greatly appreciate you contacting us concerning the Andrew and Silas Chandler photo exhibit at the Corinth Civil War Interpretative Center in Corinth, Mississippi, in conjunction with the continuing research you are performing on the relationship of Andrew and his slave Silas.  Attached is a proposed rewrite I have drafted to replace the incorrect text accompanying the Chandler image on display at the Center, to more accurately reflect Silas’ service as a slave with his master during the conflict. Please feel free to comment on the proposed draft.  We would be most interested to know if your research into the master – slave relationship of Andrew and Silas has discovered whether Silas was or was not present with Andrew at Shiloh?

I looked over the proposed rewrite and can report that the necessary changes were made to reflect their relationship as well as the type of pension that Silas received in 1916.  While Silas indicates in his pension that he accompanied Andrew on August 8, 1861 I cannot confirm that he was present at Shiloh.  Of course, I will keep them updated as my research progresses.  Special thanks to Stacey Allen – a top-notch historian in his own right – and the rest of the staff for giving this the attention that I believe it deserves.  It’s a testament to the hard interpretive work that they do on a daily basis.

“Can You Run?” by The Steeldrivers

I am not a big bluegrass music fan so a great deal of it related to the Civil War goes unnoticed by me.  Luckily, I have readers who are kind enough to email me with references to the Civil War that they have come across.  This post is the result of just such an email from a reader in Toronto.  The song tells the story of slaves escaping to the Union lines to join the army.  It was written and performed by The Steeldrivers.  Enjoy.

The lyrics can be found below. Continue reading