Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc.

Many of you have no doubt noticed the new banner advertisement in the header.  I couldn’t be more pleased to host an ad for the Abraham Lincoln Book Shop in Chicago.  I had the opportunity to visit the store a few years ago and I hope to visit again at some point soon to take part in a Virtual Book Signing event once my Crater study is released.  This is a perfect example of the kind of companies that I hope to feature on this site.  I want to showcase the products and services of companies that add value to the Civil War community and the Abraham Lincoln Book Shop fits this niche perfectly.  Click through the banner ad and take a few minutes to explore what I think is one of the most unique bookstores in the country.

I hope to be able to announce the addition of a major academic publisher of Civil War studies to the line-up in the very near future.  Click here for additional information about advertising on Civil War Memory?

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The Real Price of Forgetting the Past (Continued)

Dixie Outfitters t-shirt

In response to my last post in which I suggested that public historians have reason to feel good about the seismic interpretive shifts that can be seen in our museum’s and other historical institutions John Hennessy offers the following:

As it relates to the supply-side of the equation, I think there is little doubt that there is something to your and Pete’s declaration of victory. But on the consumer side–not entirely. Anyone would be hard-pressed to declare to the front-line staff on an NPS battlefield site that the issue of disputed memory/history/heritage/tradition is settled in the public’s mind. There HAS been great progress, and we see evidence of that on a regular basis, but we also see evidence of discord literally every day. And then, too, there is the issue the entrenched disconnect between the public history of the Civil War and the African-American community. As has often been said, history doesn’t turn the page, only historians do. [my emphasis]

I think John is absolutely right and this is an issue that came up a few times during the conference in Raleigh, but it didn’t receive nearly enough attention.  My paper attempted to sketch some of the challenges that the National Park Service in Petersburg face in attracting African Americans and the local community to the battlefield.  I am in now way suggesting that NPS historians need to spend their time generating plans on how to go about attracting any one group of Americans.  I’m not even sure how one would go about this.  At the same time and given their location within a predominantly black community I do believe that the NPS does have a responsibility to be sensitive to the extent to which decisions made within its own institution and beyond served to alienate African Americans from a landscape that figured prominently in a narrative that traced the transition from slavery to freedom.

It is clear to me that public historians need to spend much more time coming to terms with the myriad ways in which Americans approach their past.  With all of the attention being paid to how little Americans supposedly know about the past, it would be much more helpful to try to better understand why so many of us feel drawn to the past.  [One useful source is Roy Rozensweig’s and Thelen’s, The Presence of the Past.]  A new YouTube video interview of H.K. Edgerton by the Sons of Confederate Veterans points to just how important this is if we hope to offer an interpretation of the past that responds to the needs of various consumers of history.  I’ve written extensively about H.K. and while I find him to be quite entertaining it would be a big mistake to dismiss him without considering his core message.  I find it very difficult to follow much of his thinking about slavery, Reconstruction, the Klan, and Nathan Bedford Forrest in this video.  Frankly, I don’t get the sense that H.K. has read much history at all.

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Declaring Victory

This past weekend I took part in a conference on the Civil War and public history at North Carolina State University.  I heard a number of interesting presentations and I will likely comment on them over the next few weeks, but for now I want to say a few quick words about one specific point made during the course of the day.  A number of the presentations, including my own, addressed issues relating to the continued interpretive divide that still exists between historians and segments of the general public.  You can guess which organizations were mentioned at one point or another as examples of this resistance.  In response to John Hennessy’s keynote address Peter Carmichael encouraged the audience to “declare victory” in reference to the interpretive wars.  He is right.  Public historians working in a wide range of historical institutions are now interpreting the war from a much broader perspective that includes the stories of individuals and groups, who have for far too long been left out of our collective memory.  The difficult issues such of slavery and race are now being explored from every possible angle.  Finally, the recent focus on historical memory has made us all more sensitive to the consequences of being left out of the nation’s collective memory.

I’ve been suggesting something along the lines of a declaration of victory for some time now.  The calls of “revisionism” and emotional defenses of “Southern heritage” are little more than a reflection of an intellectual bankruptcy that was always present in many of the more traditional interpretations that tended to focus more on emotional defense as opposed to an analytical understanding of the past.  John Hennessy hit the mark in his keynote address when he noted that the Civil War is one of the only places in American history where the personal anecdote is expected to frame the national narrative.  You know what this looks like: My great grandfather never owned slaves….

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Your Own Confederate Village (Loyal Slaves are Extra!)

Description: Now you can journey back to the days when gentlemen took up arms to defend the South’s honor. This collectible Civil War era decorative village collection invites you to begin your trip back in time with Issue One featuring the Justice Courthouse and FREE General Robert E. Lee figurine. Before long, the historic charm of your village collection grows with Issue Two, Confederate Station with FREE General Jackson figurine. Additional village buildings, each a separate issue and some with select free figurines and accessories, will follow.

Available exclusively from The Bradford Exchange, Hawthorne Village Division, this collectible Civil War era decorative village collection allows you to relive the gallantry of a long-ago time with exquisitely handcrafted and detailed illuminated village buildings, each inspired by an era rich with history and culture. Imagine gathering in the town square to exchange news of the Cause and show your fervent support for the boys in gray. Watch the dashing General Robert E. Lee ride by on his stallion Traveler and admire the elegant, ornate buildings that reveal the gallant spirit of America’s Civil War South. It’s all waiting for you, but don’t delay!

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Joe Glatthaar on “Why the Confederacy Lost”

Looks like Vanderbilt University has put together a first rate speakers series [see here, here, and here] on the Civil War.  It is safe to say that the most important book to be published on the Army of Northern Virginia in recent years is Joseph Glatthaar’s, General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse.  I read through the book when it was first published and have since gone through large sections of it again.  While the book offers an incredibly rich narrative it is Glatthaar’s statistical sample that constitutes the real value of this study.  Glatthaar’s statistical portrait of the ANV is slated to be published by the University of North Carolina Press: Soldiering in the Army of Northern Virginia: A Statistical Portrait of the Troops Who Served under Robert E. Lee.  You get a taste of this aspect of the book in this presentation.

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