Declaring Victory

This past weekend I took part in a conference on the Civil War and public history at North Carolina State University.  I heard a number of interesting presentations and I will likely comment on them over the next few weeks, but for now I want to say a few quick words about one specific point made during the course of the day.  A number of the presentations, including my own, addressed issues relating to the continued interpretive divide that still exists between historians and segments of the general public.  You can guess which organizations were mentioned at one point or another as examples of this resistance.  In response to John Hennessy’s keynote address Peter Carmichael encouraged the audience to “declare victory” in reference to the interpretive wars.  He is right.  Public historians working in a wide range of historical institutions are now interpreting the war from a much broader perspective that includes the stories of individuals and groups, who have for far too long been left out of our collective memory.  The difficult issues such of slavery and race are now being explored from every possible angle.  Finally, the recent focus on historical memory has made us all more sensitive to the consequences of being left out of the nation’s collective memory.

I’ve been suggesting something along the lines of a declaration of victory for some time now.  The calls of “revisionism” and emotional defenses of “Southern heritage” are little more than a reflection of an intellectual bankruptcy that was always present in many of the more traditional interpretations that tended to focus more on emotional defense as opposed to an analytical understanding of the past.  John Hennessy hit the mark in his keynote address when he noted that the Civil War is one of the only places in American history where the personal anecdote is expected to frame the national narrative.  You know what this looks like: My great grandfather never owned slaves….

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Your Own Confederate Village (Loyal Slaves are Extra!)

Description: Now you can journey back to the days when gentlemen took up arms to defend the South’s honor. This collectible Civil War era decorative village collection invites you to begin your trip back in time with Issue One featuring the Justice Courthouse and FREE General Robert E. Lee figurine. Before long, the historic charm of your village collection grows with Issue Two, Confederate Station with FREE General Jackson figurine. Additional village buildings, each a separate issue and some with select free figurines and accessories, will follow.

Available exclusively from The Bradford Exchange, Hawthorne Village Division, this collectible Civil War era decorative village collection allows you to relive the gallantry of a long-ago time with exquisitely handcrafted and detailed illuminated village buildings, each inspired by an era rich with history and culture. Imagine gathering in the town square to exchange news of the Cause and show your fervent support for the boys in gray. Watch the dashing General Robert E. Lee ride by on his stallion Traveler and admire the elegant, ornate buildings that reveal the gallant spirit of America’s Civil War South. It’s all waiting for you, but don’t delay!

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Joe Glatthaar on “Why the Confederacy Lost”

Looks like Vanderbilt University has put together a first rate speakers series [see here, here, and here] on the Civil War.  It is safe to say that the most important book to be published on the Army of Northern Virginia in recent years is Joseph Glatthaar’s, General Lee’s Army: From Victory to Collapse.  I read through the book when it was first published and have since gone through large sections of it again.  While the book offers an incredibly rich narrative it is Glatthaar’s statistical sample that constitutes the real value of this study.  Glatthaar’s statistical portrait of the ANV is slated to be published by the University of North Carolina Press: Soldiering in the Army of Northern Virginia: A Statistical Portrait of the Troops Who Served under Robert E. Lee.  You get a taste of this aspect of the book in this presentation.

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Library of Congress to Archive Civil War Memory

This morning I received the following email address from the Library of Congress.  I have a great deal of control over the content of this site because it is self-hosted, but what happens after I am no longer around?  Well, it looks like interested readers will have permanent access to the content of this site for a very long time and that makes me very happy.  I love the idea of this site being saved as a point of entry on how the Civil War was remembered at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

The United States Library of Congress has selected your website for inclusion in the historic collection of Internet materials related to the American Civil War Sesquicentennial.  The Library of Congress preserves the Nation’s cultural artifacts and provides enduring access to them. The Library’s traditional functions, acquiring, cataloging, preserving and serving collection materials of historical importance to the Congress and the American people to foster education and scholarship, extend to digital materials, including websites.

We request your permission to collect your website and add it to the Library’s research collections. In order to properly archive this URL, and potentially other URLs of interest on your site, we would appreciate your permission to archive both this URL and other portions of your site. With your permission, the Library of Congress or its agent will engage in the collection of content from your website at regular intervals over time and make this collection available to researchers both at Library facilities and, by special arrangement, to scholarly research institutions.  In addition, the Library hopes that you share its vision of preserving Internet materials and permitting researchers from across the world to access them.

Our Web Archives are important because they contribute to the historical record, capturing information that could otherwise be lost. With the growing role of the Web as an influential medium, records of historic events could be considered incomplete without materials that were “born digital” and never printed on paper. For more information about these Web Archive collections, please visit our website.

[I will provide more information as it becomes available.]

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George Rable on “The Civil War As a Political Crisis”

Few Civil War historians have been more prolific over as large a segment of the historical landscape than George Rable of the University of Alabama.  I’ve read most of his books and I always find that my understanding of the period deepens as a result.  Rable is one of those historians that makes you smarter after having read one of his books.  My two favorites are The Confederate Republic: A Revolution Against Politics (Civil War America) and Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg!, which in my mind is one of the most innovative Civil War campaign studies ever written.  His most recent book is, God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War (Littlefield History of the Civil War Era), which I am thoroughly enjoying.

If you are not familiar with Rable’s scholarship this is the perfect place to start.

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