Acquisitions 10/08

bonnerjacketI had a wonderful time in Louisville at the SHA.  It’s a wonderful opportunity to listen to thoughtful presentations and meet up with old friends.   When I have time I will share some thoughts about one of the panels on Civil War memory and the Sesquicentennial.  Of course, one of the best features of the conference is the book room, which features most of the major publishers that deal in Civil War and Southern history.  Most of the books are available at a significant discount.  Here is what I picked up this year:

Robert E. Bonner Mastering America: Southern Slaveholders and the Crisis of American Nationhood (Cambridge University Press, 2009).

Paul D. Escott, ed., North Carolinians in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction (University of North Carolina Press, 2008).

Leeanna Keith, The Colfax Massacre: The Untold Story of Black Power, White Terror, and the Death of Reconstruction (Oxford University Press, 2008).

LeeAnn Whites and Alecia P. Long, eds., Occupied Women: Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War (Louisiana State University Press, 2009).

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Last Minute Assignment at the Southern

shaSo, just as I was finishing packing for my trip to Louisville tomorrow when I received a phone call asking me to moderate a panel on Saturday morning.  I will be filling in for Gary Gallagher on a session titled, “The Public Presentation and Interpretation of Slavery and Slave Resistance: A Roundtable Discussion.” It’s a topic that I am very interested in and I was more than happy to accept the request.  I was pleased to see John Latschar’s name as one of the panelists, but unfortunately he has decided not to attend.  That’s too bad.  It would have given me the opportunity to thank him for all of his hard work at Gettysburg.  I’ve read through plenty of commentary over the past week by people who have tried to minimize Latschar’s accomplishments at Gettysburg, but all you have to do is listen to those on the inside and you will understand just how important he was in helping to bring about some of the most significant to the physical landscape and interpretation at the park.  Who better to talk about the importance of addressing difficult topics such as slavery at our Civil War battlefields and other public sites than John Latschar.  Peter Carmichael will be filling in for Latschar.

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Richard Slotkin’s Crater

cemeteryridge_evm00001255The following review of Richard Slotkin’s new book, No Quarter: The Battle of the Crater, 1864 is now available in the latest edition of Civil War Book Review.

With the publication of three books on the battle of the Crater in the past two years, one might reasonably ask if there is a need for yet another. These previous treatments (written mainly by non-academic historians) have collectively addressed the tactical complexity of the battle, including the early morning explosion of 8,000 pounds of black powder under a Confederate salient and they have provided an exhaustive account of the close-quarter combat and blood-letting that ensued for close to eight hours on a battlefield that was ripped open by the initial blast. Such a focus is a staple of traditional military history. But as much as we have learned about the nature of combat in the trenches around Petersburg in the summer of 1864 there are key aspects of this battle that have not been sufficiently addressed by the previous literature.

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Civil War Memory Turns Four

The following post originally appeared on December 12, 2005

Being Ed Ayers

In the most recent issue of North and South there is a very interesting exchange between Ed Ayers and a letter to the editor in the Crossfire section. The writer responded to Ayers’s article, “What Caused the Civil War” which appeared in a previous issue (Vol. 8, #5); the article is essentially a reprint from his most recent book of essays titled, What Caused the Civil War: Reflections on the South and Southern History. I think Ayers is one of the more talented historians writing today. I’ve read through his Pulitzer-Prize nominated book, The Promise of the New South so many times that it has a rubber band around it to keep it together. The only other book in my library in that condition is Plato’s Republic. More recently Ayers won the Bancroft Prize for In the Presence of Mine Enemies which is based on his Valley of the Shadow project out of the University of Virginia.

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Acquisitions 11/02/09

9780812970388Here is the latest in recent acquisitions. On Thursday I head to Louisville, Kentucky for the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association.  No doubt, I will end up lugging a bag of books home with me.

Thomas A. Desjardin, Stand Firm Ye Boys From Maine: The 20th Maine and the Gettysburg Campaign (Oxford University Press, 1995 – 25th anniversary edition)

Wayne Wei-Siang Hsieh, West Pointers in the Civil War: The Old Army in War and Peace (University of North Carolina Press, 2009)

Robert M. Poole, On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery (Walker & Company, 2009)

Thomas Sugrue, Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North (Random House, 2009)

Joan Waugh, U.S. Grant: American Hero, American Myth (University of North Carolina Press, 2009)

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John J. Dwyer’s “War Between the States” in Video

Not too long ago I commented on a popular homeschooling textbook on the Civil War by John J. Dwyer, titled, The War Between the States: America’s Uncivil War.  This is the video promo for that textbook.  It is a truly remarkable modern day Lost Cause inspired account of the war.  It essentially pits a God-fearing South against a Godless and barbaric North that accomplished nothing during the war except for the terrorizing and destroying of southern homes and farms.  A wonderful example of mental child abuse pure and simple.

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A Blistering Review

9780307263438Like many of you I’ve read John Keegan’s Face of Battle (1976) and can appreciate the contribution it made to the historiography of military history and its influence on countless Civil War historians who have written about the experience of the common soldier.  Other than that, however, I haven’t read much of Keegan’s scholarship. I’m just not that well read in military history outside of the Civil War.  I have to admit that I was just a bit excited about Keegan’s new military synthesis of the Civil War until I came across James McPherson’s review.  This is a pretty tough review as McPherson reviews go.  The mistakes cited by McPherson are that much more damaging given that Keegan is seen by many as an expert on geostrategic analysis.  Even the characterizations of Grant, Sherman, Lee, and Jackson seem to be quite weak.  Why do I have a feeling that we will see this book remaindered within a year.

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Jim Limber Kidnapped and Brought to Beauvoir

Statue026It looks like Gary Casteel’s statue of Jefferson Davis holding hands with his biological son and “adopted” son, Jim Limber, has found a new home at Beauvoir.  You may remember that this statue was commissioned by the Sons of Confederate Veterans in hopes that it would be placed next to the Lincoln statue at the Tredegar Iron Works.  That deal fell through and left the organization scrambling for alternative sites.  At one point they even asked the state of Mississippi to accept it.

Since the SCV meant to “educate” the public about Jefferson Davis and race relations during the Civil War with this statue, it is hard not to see this new home as reflecting nothing less than a complete and utter public relations failure.  The reason the statue ended up here has nothing to do with political correctness or any other catch-phrase that is currently en vogue.  It has to do with the fact that the statue has little to do with solid history and has everything to do with the current SCV propaganda machine which would have the general public see the Confederacy as part of some sort of civil rights movement.  I’ve written quite a bit about this particular story over the past year if interested.

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