From the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan to the White Citizens’ Councils

Just finished reading Jill Ogline Titus’s thoughtful essay on the Civil War sesquicentennial and its renewed focus on the themes of slavery and emancipation in the most recent issue of The Journal of the Civil War Era. Jill surveys how various institutions have interpreted these controversial themes through their exhibits, symposia, and websites. [click to continue…]

0 comments

Gary Gallagher on the Spring of 1864

On May 7 Gary Gallagher delivered a lecture on the war in 1864 at the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond. Those of you familiar with Gallagher’s work won’t find anything new, but he is entertaining as usual. Enjoy. [click to continue…]

0 comments

What’s In a Number?

There’s been a lot of talk lately about numbers, specifically in assessing the number of Civil War dead. J. David Hacker’s essay “A Census-Based Count of the Civil War Dead” appeared in a 2011 issue of Civil War History. The essay received a great deal of attention and a shorter version appeared in the New York Times Disunion blog. Keith Harris offers some thoughts here. More recently, Nicholas Marshall published an essay in The Journal of the Civil War Era that can be seen, in part, as a response to Hacker. Whether Marshall’s essay garners as much traction has yet to be seen, but it did receive a thorough critique from fellow blogger Vince Slaugh at Lancaster at War. [click to continue…]

2 comments

“In Memory We Trust”

Allison Gillingham is working on an M.A. Thesis that tracks what Americans from different generations and ethnic backgrounds believe about the Civil War. The interviews are being posted on Vimeo and are quite interesting.

I’m not quite sure what this individual is planning to do with these interviews, but it is another example of how social media can complicate our understanding of how Americans remember the Civil War Era.

7 comments

Charles Reagan Wilson Asks, “Whose South?”

6 comments