Ta-Nehisi Coates and Civil War Memory

Congratulations to Ta-Nehisi Coates, who is the recipient of this year’s National Book Award in non-fiction for Between the World and Me, which has been on the New York Times’s bestseller list for 17 weeks. I read it the first week of its release and thoroughly enjoyed it. Below is Coates’s very emotional and humble acceptance speech.

At some point I want to write an essay about Coates’s understanding of the Civil War and historical memory. Continue reading “Ta-Nehisi Coates and Civil War Memory”

A Confederate Heritage Gaffe

Earlier today I was interviewed by a local NPR station in Atlanta on the situation at Stone Mountain. The story and interview should be available tomorrow morning. While plans for a monument to Martin Luther King, Jr. appear to be on hold, an exhibit on black Union soldiers is moving forward. Our conversation focused on this exhibit and the significance of its location on the grounds of Stone Mountain.

Over the weekend a relatively small rally took place at Stone Mountain to protest the King monument. Those in attendance offer another example of why the very people who claim to defend the memory of Confederate soldiers and the flag have done more than anyone else to provide the impetus for communities to remove reminders of the Confederacy from public places. Continue reading “A Confederate Heritage Gaffe”

Civil War Memory’s Fall Peak

Here is a pic of one of my favorite Civil War soldier monuments at Forest Hills Cemetery here in Boston. It’s about two miles from my home and as we are just about past the peak of the Fall foliage season it was the perfect day for a walk. Oh, and the temperature today hit 70 degrees. The sculptor of this particular monument – one of the earliest monuments to be dedicated after the war – is none other than Martin Millmore.

Martin Millmore

Ole Miss Student Senate Votes to Remove State Flag

Just when you thought the wave of reports about Confederate flag removals had crested, we get hit by another one. Last week Florida’s state senate voted to remove the Confederate from its official seal. In Greene County, Tennessee a county commissioner proposed raising a Confederate flag in front of the courthouse, which was overwhelmingly voted down. Maryland will likely join Virginia in banning the Confederate flag from license plates. And among the “Heritage, Not Hate” crowd fifteen members of a group calling itself, “Respect the Flag” were indicted on terrorism charges following an incident that took place in Georgia over the summer. Continue reading “Ole Miss Student Senate Votes to Remove State Flag”

Another Civil War Crowdfunding Debacle

Crowdfunding campaigns have not been kind to Civil War movie productions. The producers for the Civil War mini-series “To Appomattox” attempted a Kickstarter campaign, but was met with little interest and even Ron Maxwell failed in his attempt to fund a project that would bring famous works of historical fiction to life. Smaller productions have met with a similar fate.

The latest is an attempt to turn one of Lochlainn Seabrook’s books about Nathan Bedford Forrest into a feature film. Seabrook runs Sea Raven Press, which publishes Civil War books from a “Southern point of view.” Continue reading “Another Civil War Crowdfunding Debacle”