Category Archives: Civil War Sesquicentennial

This Civil War Buff Has Not Been Disappointed

waiting

Did You Buy Your Toy Soldiers?

As we get closer to April 2015 we will begin to read even more in the way of assessment of the sesquicentennial. The problem with these observations thus far, including this article by Wall Street Journal reporter Cameron McWhirter, is that they take a much too narrow approach to measuring the scope of what has taken place over the past few years and how it will likely impact how Americans will  learn about the Civil War in the future. I spent 30 minutes on the phone with Mr. McWhirter, but unfortunately, nothing that I shared made it into the published version. Continue reading

Why Doesn’t the SCV Find This Offensive?

You would think that the Sons of Confederate Veterans would issue a clear statement condemning the way in which these Waldron High School teens have chosen to display the flag. I particularly appreciate the respect shown for the rich heritage associated with this flag by flying it from the back of a pick-up truck while off-road driving. The mud adds a nice touch to the flag. The Confederate soldier certainly appreciates these kids taking the time to remember their sacrifice.

Yep, the future of Southern/Confederate heritage is in good hands.

Son of a Confederate Veteran That We Should All Celebrate

Judge Waites Waring Statue Outside Federal Courthouse in Charleston, SC

Judge Waites Waring Statue Outside Federal Courthouse in Charleston, SC

On April 11 at statue to Judge Julius Waites Waring will be unveiled in Charleston, South Carolina. Waring was the son of a Confederate veteran, who was eventually appointed by Franklin Roosevelt to the federal bench. He is best remembered for his dissent in the 1951 case, Briggs vs. Elliott, which anticipated the landmark case of Brown vs. Board of Ed a few years later. In his dissent Waring concluded that, “segregation in education can never produce equality and it is an evil that must be eradicated . . . . Segregation is per se inequality.” Continue reading