Category Archives: Lost Cause

Stonewall Jackson’s Black Friend

Update: Richard Williams has decided to respond to this post on his blog. What I find interesting is that he has nothing to say about the content of the post. Instead he takes issue with one of my comments about my characterization of his understanding of the influence of Nat Turner’s Rebellion on race/slavery and religion in Virginia.  Williams declares that many academics are “cynical” about attempts on the part of slaveholders to teach the gospel yet he provides not a single reference.  It is unclear as to why this should matter to begin with. Their attitude is irrelevant.  What matters is the interpretation.  A quick perusal of the bibliography points to an over reliance on relatively few secondary sources, which is why I take issue with his analysis of religion in a slaveholding society.  There simply isn’t much to work with.  I will leave it to you to judge.

Jim Lewis and Jackson in "Gods and Generals".

Jim Lewis and Jackson in “Gods and Generals”.

My recent essay on Confederate camp servants in The Civil War Monitor opens with a reference to an account in Edward Porter Alexander’s Fighting for the Confederacy.  In it he discusses the purchase of a camp servant named Charley and a horse.  Interestingly, Alexander refers to both as an “appendage”.  That reference, I believe, tells us a great deal about race relations in the South as well as the value of enslaved blacks to the Confederate war effort and individual officers who utilized personal servants.  Continue reading

Restore the Honor, Remove the Flaggers

Yesterday my wife and I stopped briefly at the Pelham Chapel in Richmond, which is the site of the ongoing protest by a group that styles itself, the Virginia Flaggers.  As many of you know their protest is focused on the recent removal of Confederate flags from outside the chapel itself.  I was hoping to see some Flaggers in action, but in the end I am glad that they decided to take the day off.  For the first time in my many visits the chapel was actually open.  We weren’t able to spend too much time, but it is an impressive little building.  Continue reading

Nathan Bedford Forrest For Teens

Nathan Bedford ForrestWorried about who your teenager idolizes?  Well, now you can return them to the good old days of the Civil War and Southern chivalry with Lochlainn Seabrook’s book about Nathan Bedford Forrest that is geared specifically for teens.

Ride along with Forrest and get a firsthand look at his childhood in Tennessee, his teens in Mississippi, his first years away from home, his marriage and children, his multimillion dollar businesses, the start of the American “Civil War,” his enrollment in the Confederate army, and his rise to fame as a daring and successful Rebel officer.  Thrill to the dramatic descriptions of General Forrest’s exploits on and off the battlefield as he and his courageous cavalry (which included 64 black Confederate soldiers) fought their way across the South defending hearth, home, honor, and the constitutional right of self-government.

Find out why the General’s men loved and respected him, why the Southern people looked up to him as their “Spiritual Comforter,” and why he freed his slaves years before Lincoln issued his fake and illegal Emancipation Proclamation.  After Lincoln’s War, follow Forrest as he rebuilt his life from scratch, and helped the South regain her political power and dignity during the Yankees’ cruel and revengeful “Reconstruction” period.  See how the great Confederate chieftain lived out his final years campaigning for black civil rights, giving generously to charities, forgiving the North, and working to heal the physical and emotional wounds left by the War for Southern Independence.

Along the way, you will learn the truth about Forrest and Southern slavery and about Lincoln’s War on the Constitution and the American people, truths that have been hidden for a century and a half by uneducated enemies of the South.  Parents, you will enjoy reading this heavily illustrated compact little book as well, for it contains hundreds of important historical facts that neither you or your children were ever taught in school.

This guy’s basement press makes Pelican look mainstream.  I’ve perused these titles in the past, but this one takes the cake.  One wonders if the details behind that multimillion dollar business will be shared, but I won’t hold my breadth.  I have no doubt that this represents a rearguard action in how we remember and teach the Civil War, but it is hard not to be sympathetic with the few who will fall under its spell at no fault of their own.

I’ve Seen the Future of Civil War History…

…but it may take me some time to sort through it all.  Had a great time in Gettysburg this weekend.  I was challenged intellectually.  I caught up with old friends and even made a few new ones.  It’s the kind of weekend that leaves you exhausted, but rejuvenated and ready to tackle new projects.

For now I want to leave you with an image that Jonathan Noyalas analyzed in a panel on teaching Civil War memory that I took part in on Friday.  Enjoy.

Duffs Rebel Restaurant from Noyalas

Think I Might Join Sons of Confederate Veterans

sons of confederate veteransIn his report to the SCV’s National Leadership Conference Adjutant-in-Chief Steve Ritchie noted the following:

Adjutant Ritchie then announced what he claimed would be a controversial fact, that there is no national constitutional requirement for proof of lineage/descent from a Confederate veteran for membership in the SCV.  The membership packet required at national SCV headquarters includes a completed application, a check and preferably a type written summary of the applicants information but no paperwork for descent documentation is required by national headquarters.  Membership records are kept as hardcopies at SCV National headquarters.  SCV National does no genealogy verification.  The application requires camp officer signatures to substantiate membership satisfaction and camp requirements vary.  Compiled service records are sometimes illegible or inaccurate and many were lost during the War especially when towns were burned and razed such as in Sherman’s march.  Additional resources include the American Civil War Research database and Broadfoot’s records of Confederate veterans.  UCV and pension records are additional resources.  He highlighted that how an ancestor was separated or location of his burial may be unknown and don’t get hung up on those details when completing the application.

You have to wonder why this point was raised and whether it will lead to changes in recruitment policy on the local level.  Dispensing with the lineage requirement in what is clearly the most vocal Confederate heritage organization would certainly make it easier to fill the ranks and even branch out to welcome the descendants of all those loyal black soldiers, who we can’t quite match up with wartime records.  Apparently, we can blame Sherman for the lack of records.  At the same time it could undercut the organization’s own claims to authority based largely on their lineal descent.  We will have to see how this plays out.