Category Archives: Lost Cause

Common-place Marks the Civil War 150 with Special Issue

I couldn’t be more excited to share Common-place’s latest issue on the Civil War sesquicentennial that I had the pleasure to edit with Megan Kate Nelson. We are confident that each of you will find something of interest in this issue. The essays cover a wide range of topics and will hopefully both enlighten and entertain. Special thanks to all the contributors to this issue. We had the pleasure to work with an incredibly talented group of historians and educators, who were both committed to producing their best work and patient with our suggestions and numerous emails. Thanks also to the wonderful editorial staff at Common-place, especially Paul Erickson and Trudy Powers. Continue reading

 

Defending Lee-Jackson Day from Me and My Followers

I haven’t linked to my Old Virginia Blog buddy in quite some time, but in recent weeks my site has received a great deal of attention from his little corner of the Shenandoah Valley. With that in mind I thought I would quickly return the favor by pointing out that Richard William completely missed the mark in reference to my recent post on Lee-Jackson Day:

Kevin Levin, who has expressed the view he saw no reason to celebrate Lee-Jackson Day, posed the question noted above. Kevin and many of his followers would like to see the tradition of honoring Lee and Jackson in Virginia (and other places in the South) thrown on the trash heap of history.

This is news to me. I don’t see how any reasonable reading of the post could warrant such a conclusion. While I don’t have much of anything invested in Lee-Jackson Day I have absolutely no problem if others wish to acknowledge it in some shape or form. I attended a couple of Lee-Jackson Day events in Charlottesville, Virginia during my time there and even over the years brought a couple of my classes to view the ceremony. Whether it ought to be acknowledged by the state is something that Virginians themselves must decide and for now I think the holiday is safe. Continue reading

 

Shocking! Outrageous! – The Great Emancipator Owned Slaves

Latest Post Comment at SHPG: “I understand that there are slave quarters at the Lincoln home and they just make the claim that it was his barn. In the middle of the city!”

Update: Lincoln ordered infants into the army and Popeye’s Secret Fried Chicken recipe has also been discovered in a Civil War glass vial.

Southern Heritage Preservatin GroupThe Southern Heritage Preservation Group is committed to defending Confederate heritage and highlighting history that has been left out of school textbooks and ignored by revisionist left-wing historians and the liberal media. Yesterday, Gary Adams posted a shocking news item that claims that Abraham Lincoln owned slaves. He provided a link to a February 2012 article by Frank Lake at the Weekly World News. Do yourself a favor and read it and on once you finish laughing continue with the post.

The article itself has nothing to do with Lincoln owning slaves besides including claims to that effect at the beginning and end. The rest of it discusses a recently published book about Lincoln and colonization, which if Adams bothered to look at has nothing to do with whether the sixteenth president owned slaves. Continue reading

 

“Our Focus is Educating People Today”

Bonus: Seems to me the Virginia Flaggers should be protesting the Virginia Military Institute over this decision. Let’s see if they do anything.

Everett-B-D-Julio_XX_The-Last-Meeting-Of-Lee-And-Jackson-1864_XX_Museum-Of-The-Confederacy-Richmond-VirginiaTomorrow is the annual gathering in Lexington, Virginia to mark Lee-Jackson Day, but you don’t get the sense that the diehards are very excited. Yes, the Virginia Flaggers will be there protesting a ban on their beloved flag on city light posts by marching in the streets with their Confederate flags. This remains one of the most ludicrous heritage protests of recent years as you are still permitted to wave as many flags in Lexington’s public places as your heart desires. You just can’t do so on public light poles.

You don’t get the sense from Brandon Dorsey, who organized the event, that he expects a large crowd. Continue reading