Is This an Appropriate Role for the National Park Service?

I have nothing but the utmost respect for the men and women of the National Park Service, who help to preserve and interpret our nation’s historic sites.  They include some of the most passionate and talented historians.  For those focused on Civil War related sites their jobs come with increased attention and scrutiny by the media as well as various interest groups who have a stake in maintaining or protecting a specific narrative of the war.

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Why Is There So Little Interest In the Civil War in the South?

There are two Civil War Sesquicentennial memes that get bandied about without any reflection at all.  The first suggests that white Southerners are still fighting the Civil War or that they are holding onto a traditional narrative that is being threatened by various external forces.   Even a cursory glance at recent commemorative events in South Carolina suggests that the story is much more complex.  The second also plays up supposed strict regional differences that assumes a closer, more emotional need to remember the Civil War in the South than the North.

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Does Antietam Need a New Monument?

According to Brian Schoeneman it does.  That name might right a bell for regular readers of CWM.  On occasion, Brian has commented not so much on the content of my posts, but on my handling of various discussion threads.  Brian is a candidate for Virginia House of Delegates in Fairfax, Virginia.  Recently he toured South Mountain, Harpers Ferry, and Antietam with Scott Manning.  As a campaign promise, Brian promised the following:

I asked Brian if he was surprised at the lack of Confederate monuments. “Actually, I am. It kinda annoys me. There are about a zillion Union monuments here. Granted, the North took more casualties at Antietam, but they had more guys to lose.” He recalled one of the informational markers he read, “The Army of Northern Virginia lost about a quarter of their strength and the Army of the Potomac lost about an eighth. It was much harder for the South to replace those casualties than it was for the North.” Brian clarified that, if elected, he planned to introduce legislation next year to place a Virginia state monument on the battlefield in commemoration of the sesquicentennial. I pointed out that such a move could backfire if not done properly and he interrupted me, “There’s nothing political about recognizing that folks in the army of the state that I’m from fought here and died here. They deserve to be remembered regardless of what side they fought on and it bothers me there is nothing here, because I know there are plenty at Gettysburg.”

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Why the Black Confederate Myth Will Remain a Myth

We all know that certain Civil War narratives die hard, none more so than the black Confederate myth.  While it will continue to spread on the Web and rear its ugly head from time to time in various popular forums it will never gain legitimacy in our most respected private and public historical institutions.  This fact has nothing to do with a conspiracy to conceal the facts from the general public or some vaguely defined liberal bias and everything to do with what we know about this subject.

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NPS Talks Slavery and Battlefield Interpretation

One of my readers was kind enough to pass on the following video, which was originally used as part of a training course for National Park Service interpreters.  The video includes interviews with various interpreters on the necessity and challenges associated with introducing the cause of the war on Civil War battlefields.  There are a number of perspectives presented, but all convey the importance of doing so.