Teaching

John Hennessy has an incredibly thought provoking post up over at Frederickburg Remembered, which addresses the challenges of "portraying violence" in public history.  No one is better positioned to speak on such a subject: Having worked on or with battle sites for much of my career (which seems impossibly long these days), there is no [...]

Well, it's early Sunday morning and I am sitting in my office preparing my classes for the start of a new trimester.  Once again, I am teaching an elective called, Civil War Memory, which I've offered over the past three years.  The course has taken different forms from a standard readings course to a course [...]

Every year as I prepare my classes I rediscover my love for the history of the American Revolution.  Like the Civil War, the Revolution enjoys a wide range of talented scholars and popular writers, who continue to crank out thought-provoking studies many of which I end up incorporating into my class lectures.  This year was [...]

This week my AP classes are tackling the various reform movements of the Antebellum Period.  It should come as no surprise that we spend a great deal of time on the Abolitionist Movement and William Lloyd Garrison in particular.  This morning I began class with a fairly vague question to get the ball rolling that [...]

This year I am working with a student on an independent study that focuses on how the war effected soldiers' conception of death during the Civil War.  We are looking specifically at the war in Virginia during 1864.  Over the summer this student read This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War (Vintage [...]

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