William Mahone/Crater

Earlier today I was going through my collection of original Civil War era newspaper and came across an issue of Frank Leslie's Illustrated from July 9, 1864. The first page includes this wonderful illustration of the charge of General Hinks's "colored troops" outside of Petersburg in mid-June. Ohio troops cheer them on in the background. [...]

I am really enjoying the opportunity to go back and review the letters and diaries of white Northern soldiers who fought at the Crater. Now that I've done so I regret not going deeper into these wartime accounts in the book. Hopefully, this little essay project will make up for it. In this post I [...]

I am a big fan of Chandra Manning's book, What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil War. It's an incredibly thought-provoking book and especially helpful when it comes to understanding how Confederates conceptualized the importance of slavery throughout the war. However, I am less convinced by her analysis of how the [...]

Commemorating 1864 means, among other things, commemorating and remembering the battle of the Crater. As you might imagine the highlight for me will be the opportunity to speak in Petersburg on the anniversary of the battle itself on July 30. Beyond that I wanted to take a minute to share where I will be discussing [...]

On November 13, 1911 Union and Confederate veterans met on the Crater battlefield to dedicate a monument to all Massachusetts units that took part in the Petersburg Campaign. Alfred S. Roe delivered the dedication address and, not surprisingly, used the occasion to reinforce a public face of reconciliation with a narrative that reminded the audience [...]

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