Category Archives: William Mahone/Crater

Saturday Book Signing at Abraham Lincoln Book Shop in Chicago

Tomorrow I will be signing books at the Abraham Lincoln Book Shop in Chicago.  The signing and interview, which takes place at 12 noon, is part of their highly successful Virtual Book Signing series.  You can watch the program live online, order a signed copy of my book, Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder, and have it mailed to you directly.  The ALBS has been incredibly supportive of my blog as well as my book.  This event was scheduled about a year ago right after I announced the final approval of the manuscript.  I am really looking forward to meeting Dan Weinberg, Bjorn Skaptason and rest of the gang.  It really is an honor to be asked to participate in an event that has attracted so many talented historian.

Don’t worry if you miss tomorrow’s event as an edited version will eventually be uploaded to their YouTube page.  See you tomorrow from the “Windy City”.

Crater Book Gets Its First Review

Thanks to fellow historian, high school teacher, and blogger Jim Cullen for taking the time to write a review of my Crater book for the History News Network.  Jim’s critique is thoughtful and raises some important questions about my interpretation.  I especially appreciate the following:

One also wonders about the next turn of the wheel. Like most historians of the last half-century, Levin renders this story as one of Progress. There was what really happened, then it got hidden by a bunch of racists, and now the truth has reemerged. Without denying the salutary consequences of writing African Americans back into history — or endorsing the mindless dead-ender insistence on “heritage,” whose advocates never seem to spell out just what they’re affirming a heritage of — one wonders if the story is this simple.  What are we in the process of forgetting these days? How can such absences be traced? Where might the story go from here? These are difficult questions, and it may be unfair to expect Levin to grapple with them. Perhaps he gets credit for doing so much so well that he provokes them.

First, let me say that I do indeed consider the broad parameters of this story as one of progress.  Early on one of the reviewers asked me to address some of these questions, especially the question concerning the future of our Civil War memory.  While I decided to bring the story to the present day I never felt comfortable about abandoning the traditional ground of a historian.  I suspect my next project will free me up in this regard.

I also agree with Jim that this story is predictable for those familiar with the literature, especially David Blight’s Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, which despite recent scholarly challenges, continues to exercise a profound influence on my thinking.  That said, I didn’t write this book primarily for folks familiar with the historiography.  Yes, I hope that the book appeals to scholars, but I wrote it primarily for folks who may never have read an entire book on Civil War memory.  I wanted something that would serve as an introduction and lay out some of the tough questions that Americans have grappled with over the years.

Finally, I really appreciate the kind words about my blogging.  In many ways, this book was made possible as a result of blogging and fits neatly into this broader project of how I’ve chosen to share my interest in Civil War history and engage the general public.

A Settled Question

I am making my way through the new collection of postwar accounts that George Bernard likely intended to be a follow-up volume to his War Talks of Confederate Veterans (1892).  Bernard served in the 12th Virginia, was present at the Crater, and remained very active in the A.P. Hill Camp, Confederate Veterans.  War Talks is an invaluable source, especially when it comes to the Crater so I was very pleased to hear that a collection of reminiscences by Bernard and others was being readied for publication.

There are only a few accounts of the Crater, including Bernard’s dedication address at Blandford Church in which a tablet was placed to remember the men from the Virginia brigade who died in the battle.  The address follows a pattern which I explore in my new book on the Crater.  While private reminiscences written by Confederate veterans continued to address the strong emotions re: the presence of black Union soldiers, public addresses took little notice.  In fact, Bernard steers completely clear of what was pervasive in the letters and diaries of Confederate in the immediate wake of the battle.  According to Bernard, “Our dead comrades fought and died in defense of their rights, their homes and their firesides.”  No surprise there.

Toward the end of the speech Bernard offers some thoughts that are often overlooked by those who claim to live politically in their footsteps:

The results have been many and far reaching, but none more striking than the growing conviction among thoughtful minds of the world, those of the North included, that the people of the South, however unwise or inexpedient may have been their act of secession, were, under the circumstances that surrounded them, justified in resorting to arms to maintain the right of their States to withdraw from the Union, if they saw fit, as they did to exercise this right.  But it is proper to add here that the same omnipotent power, in His infinite wisdom has allowed future events so to shape themselves that all now regard the question of secession as finally settled against the right as claimed by the seceding states and no people of our re-united country are more loyal to it or would go further to defend it than the people of the South and especially the Confederate veterans.

We too easily lose sight of the fact that while the activities of Confederate veterans during the postwar decades reinforced their connection to the 1860s and with one another it did not prevent them from moving forward.  These men ought not to be interpreted as stuck in time.  It may not be a stretch to suggest that their experiences in the war eventually enhanced their love and attachment for the United States.

Crater Book Now Shipping

Update: Just learned that 426 copies have been sold thus far. Not bad.  Word on the street is that the SCV purchased copies for all camp commanders.

Just a quick note to say thanks to all of you who have written emails congratulating me on the release of Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder.  It’s incredibly humbling to know that folks are paying good money for my book so I do hope you enjoy it.  The book is now shipping from all major distributors, including Amazon.  I would love to get a review or two up on the Amazon page at some point soon.  Let me know what you like and what you don’t like.

Thanks again, everyone. :-)

It’s a Crater Book

Following an exhausting seven hour drive from Gettysburg I returned home to find my author copies waiting at the door.  I actually saw the book for the first time at CWI, where I was able to sign a number of copies for some of the participants and close friends.  It made the entire trip that much more enjoyable.  I have so many people to thank, which I do in the Acknowledgments section, but let me include one paragraph that is meant for all of you.

A good deal of the material contained in this book was first introduced on my Weblog, Civil War Memory, which I began in November 2005.  The site has given me the opportunity to test new ideas with a core group of loyal readers who bring a wealth of knowledge and perspective to my work.  Rarely did a day go by that I did not receive a blog comment or private e-mail that included sound criticism or pointed me in the direction of new sources.  My readers not only helped to further my understanding of the Crater, they enriched my understanding of some of the central issues surrounding how Americans have chosen to remember the Civil War.  There are too many people to thank by name and the vast majority I have never met in person, but I hope they will embrace this book as a token of my gratitude.

The book should be officially released within the next ten days.  Thanks once again to all of you, who have traveled this road with me.  Now it is time to celebrate with the most important person in my life.