Carole Emberton Reconsiders the Black Military Experience

ffusctreI’ve been thinking quite a bit about the current state of interpretation re: the history of black Union soldiers during the Civil War and beyond in preparation for the Future of Civil War History Conference, which will take place later this week in Gettysburg.  As I’ve said before, I think there is much to celebrate as we look back over the past 50 years.  The number of scholarly and popular books being published continues at a brisk pace and popular representations of black soldiers can be seen in recent Hollywood movies such as Cold Mountain and Lincoln  and even a historical novel about USCTs at the Crater by Newt Gingrich. Most importantly, many history textbooks now devote significant space to black Union soldiers and their contributions.  Throughout much of the Civil War sesquicentennial USCTs have been front and center in museum exhibits, symposia, in the pages of local newspapers as human interest stories as well as in the form of new monuments and markers. Continue reading “Carole Emberton Reconsiders the Black Military Experience”

Spielberg, Kushner and Goodwin Discuss “Lincoln” at Richmond Forum

On January 5, 2013, director Steven Spielberg, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, and screenwriter Tony Kushner returned to Richmond, Virginia, where “Lincoln” was filmed, to discuss the process of “Bringing History to Life on Film” before an audience of 4,200. Moderated by Tim Reid.

Crowdsourcing Lincoln and Fort Sumter Classroom Simulation

fort-sumter-fireTime for a little crowdsourcing in preparation for a simulation on Lincoln and Fort Sumter that my students will perform a week from this coming Tuesday.  The overall idea is to have my students play the role of cabinet advisers and I, of course, will play Lincoln.  Since I only have nine students we should be able to have a pretty lively discussion/debate.  Yes, I am going to show up dressed like Lincoln and don’t worry as I will come prepared with plenty of responses that begin with, “That reminds me of a story…” Their responsibility is to advise me on what to do about the situation at Fort Sumter in the period following Lincoln’s inauguration. Should it be resupplied or abandoned?

I want to use the opportunity to have students consider the question from multiple perspectives and in light of recent events leading to Lincoln’s inauguration.  Based on the available evidence they will also have to argue as to the likely consequences of Lincoln’s decision for the nation.  Among other things, I want them to think about the differences between the Lower and Upper South, material differences between North and South, political differences in the North, Union, Southern Unionism, and disagreements in Lincoln’s cabinet.  Their packet will include both primary and secondary sources.  I’ve already put together a few things that I’ve used for various purposes in the past.

Secondary Sources (short excerpts)

  • Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals
  • James McPherson’s Battle Cry of Freedom
  • David Potter’s The Impending Crisis
  • Maury Klein’s Days of Defiance

Primary Sources (short excerpts)

  • Lincoln and Davis Inaugurals
  • Lincoln on Southern Unionism
  • Crittenden Compromise
  • Speeches from Virginia’s Conditional Unionists
  • Positions of Lincoln’s Cabinet members
  • Horace Greeley Editorial
  • Advice from Winfield Scott
  • Correspondence with Major Robert Anderson
  • Newspaper Editorials
  • Letters and Diaries (George Templeton Strong)
  • Maps

This is just a start, but I would really appreciate any suggestions you might have.  Please be as specific as possible and include sources.  I am especially interested in online sources because they are easily accessible.

Lincoln in the Movies

This first video is perfect for a course on Lincoln and/or Civil War memory.  It provides a nice overview of how Lincoln has been interpreted in Hollywood movies and television since 1915.  The only reference that I was unfamiliar with is the recent short animation, Robot Chicken: Jedi in Chief, in which George W. Bush faces off against Lincoln.  Enjoy.