Tag Archives: Books

The Suffering of War and Heat of Reunion

Yes, it’s a slow day here at Civil War Memory.  Not all of the credits that I earn as an Amazon affiliate go to purchasing the latest Civil War scholarship.  I don’t read much Civil War fiction, but when I do I like to curl up with a book that reminds me of the war’s pain and suffering and the joys heat of reunion. From Land of the Falling Stars:

Penniless, her parents and brother dead, Sophia Whitfield struggles to save her beloved childhood home during the Civil War. Another bluecoat is staggering down the hill, but before Sophia allows him to rob and pilfer like the others, she shoots him. How is she to know it is Gavin, the dark knight of her youth, carrying secrets too horrific to imagine and a passion that ignites her deepest desires? As Sophia gradually learns Gavin’s secrets—and enjoys his talents in the bedroom—she discovers how to finally know her own heart. Can she save the Land of Falling Stars, or will she lose it all to the horrors of the War and Reconstruction? And will the Southern lady and the Yankee soldier be able to recapture the bliss of their youth—this time in each other’s arms?

Enjoy.

Acquisitions, 11/28

I have a huge stack of books that have yet to be cracked open, including the titles listed below, but I put them all on hold to read Isabel Wilkerson’s Pulitzer Prize winning book, The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration (Random House, 2010).  It’s beautifully written and I can’t put it down.

William C. Davis and James I. Robertson, eds., Virginia at War, 1865 (University Press of Kentucky, 2011).

Eugene Genovese and Elizabeth Fox Genovese, Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

Amrita Chakrabarti Myers, Forging Freedom: Black Women and the Pursuit of Liberty in Antebellum Charleston (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Richard Newman and James Mueller, eds., Antislavery and Abolition in Philadelphia: Emancipation and the Long Struggle for Racial Justice in the City of Brotherly Love (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

William Kauffman Scarborough, The Allstons of Chicora Wood: Wealth, Honor, and Gentility in the South Carolina Lowcountry (Louisiana State University Press, 2011).

Jonathan Daniel Wells and Jennifer R. Green, eds., The Southern Middle Class in the Long Nineteenth Century (Louisiana State University Press, 2011).

Top Civil War Books for 2011 at The Civil War Monitor

Winter 2011

Yesterday I received the latest issue of The Civil War Monitor magazine.  I’ve only had a chance to skim through it, but the layout and content look great.  This issue includes essays by Glenn LaFantasie, James Marten, Steven Newton, and a pictorial piece by Ronald Coddington.  I recently purchased a 2-year subscription and I encourage you to do so as well.

This issue also includes selections for top books of 2011 by five historians including yours truly.  I am joined by George Rable, Robert K. Krick, Gerald Prokopowicz, and Ethan Rafuse.  What follows are my selections:

Click to continue

Acquisitions, 10/20 + Another Book by Earl Hess

Earl Hess’s productivity over the past five years is nothing short of mind-boggling.  Imagine my surprise when UNC Press mailed me the latest in their Littlefield History of the Civil War series.  While most people are still getting through his trilogy on Civil War earthworks Hess has released three more.

Virginia M. Adams, On the Altar of Freedom: A Black Soldier’s Civil War Letters from the Front (University of Massachusetts Press, 1991).

Stephen Berry ed., Weirding the War: Stories from the Civil War’s Ragged Edges (University of Georgia Press, 2011).

R. Blakeslee Gilpin, John Brown Still Lives!: America’s Long Reckoning with Violence, Equality, and Change (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Earl J. Hess, The Civil War in the West: Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi (University of North Carolina Press, 2011).

Noah A. Trudeau, Voices of the 55th: Letters from the 55th Massachusetts Volunteers, 1861-1865 (Morningside Press, 1996).

Acquisitions, 10/16

Click Image for Companion Website

My reading has been all over the place of late.  The only book that I’ve completed in this list is Thomas’s new study of the railroad.  I highly recommend this book and I encourage you to explore the companion digital history website that includes some wonderful primary sources and further analysis.  Click the image.

Official National Park Service Handbook, The Civil War Remembered (Eastern National, 2011).

Tom Moore Craig ed., Upcountry South Carolina Goes to War: Letters of the Anderson, Brockman, and Moore Families, 1853-1865 (University of South Carolina Press, 2009).

Williamjames Hull Hoffer, The Caning of Charles Sumner: Honor, Idealism, and the Origins of the Civil War (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010).

Richard Reid ed., Practicing Medicine in a Black Regiment: The Civil War Diary of Burt G. Wilder, 55th Massachusetts, (University of Massachusetts Press, 2010).

David S. Reynolds, Mightier than the Sword: Uncle Tom’s Cabin and the Battle for America (Norton, 2011).

Mark A. Snell, West Virginia and the Civil War: Mountaineers Are Always Free (History Press, 2011).

William G. Thomas, The Iron Way: Railroads, the Civil War, and the Making of Modern America (Yale University Press, 2011).

Click here for more books in my Civil War library.