New To the Civil War Memory Library, 09/24

Rebel YellBarbara Berenson, Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution (History Press, 2014).

Graham Dozier ed., A Gunner in Lee’s Army: The Civil War Letters of Thomas Henry Carter (University of North Carolina Press, 2014).

Harold Holzer, Lincoln and the Power of the Press: The War for Public Opinion (Simon and Schuster, 2014).

James McPherson, Embattled Rebel: Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief (Penguin, 2014).

Ethan Rafuse, Manassas: A Battlefield Guide (Bison, 2014).

Heather Cox Richadson, To Make Men Free: A History of the Republican Party (Basic, 2014).

Craig Warren, The Rebel Yell: A Cultural History (University of Alabama Press, 2014).

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 09/01

Heading back into the classroom tomorrow, but I hope to make time to get through these new releases at some point. Best of luck to all of you who are preparing for a new school year as well.

Heart of Dixie

Edward E. Baptist, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism (Basic Books, 2014).

Todd Brewster, Lincoln’s Gamble: The Tumultuous Six Months that Gave America the Emancipation Proclamation and Changed the Course of the Civil War (Scribner, 2014).

George Kimball, A Corporal’s Story: Civil War Recollections of the Twelfth Massachusetts (University of Oklahoma Press, 2014).

James Oakes, The Scorpion’s Sting: Antislavery and the Coming of the Civil War (Norton, 2014).

Anne S. Rubin, Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (University of North Carolina Press, 2014).

Jonathan White, Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln (Louisiana State University Press, 2014).

New To the Civil War Memory Library, 08/13/14

Jonathan WhitePaul Escott, Lincoln’s Dilemma: Blair, Sumner, and the Republican Struggle over Racism and Equality in the Civil War Era, (University Press of Virginia, 2014).

Evan Jones and Wiley Sword eds., Gateway to the Confederacy: New Perspectives on the Chickamauga and Chattanooga Campaigns, 1862-1863, (Louisiana State University Press, 2014).

Michael Korda, Clouds of Glory: The Life and Legend of Robert E. Lee, (Harper, 2014). I have not read through the entire book nor do I plan on doing so for the reasons outlined in Allen Guelzo’s review.

Thomas O’Connor, Civil War Boston: Home Front and Battlefield, (Northeastern University Press, 2014).

Jonathan W. White, Emancipation, the Union Army, and the Reelection of Abraham Lincoln, (Louisiana State University Press, 2014). This is a must read. White challenges long-standing views about the support within the ranks for Lincoln and the Republican Party in 1864. His analysis of the extent to which the Lincoln administration and Union high command suppressed dissent in the ranks is also very interesting.

I also want to highlight a new book co-authored by Michael Musick called “I Am Busy Drawing Pictures”: The Civil War Art and Letters of Private John Jacob Omenhauser, CSA, which you can pick up from the Friends of the Maryland State Archives. Omenhauser spent time at Point Lookout Prison. While his letters are insightful, the real prize are the incredibly rich images that detail life in prison – some of the most interesting focus on race relations and the humiliation of being guarded by black Union soldiers.

“Passes! Passes For White Folks!”

It’s impossible to deny the influence that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have had on Civil War scholarship. The two most obvious places in which you can see this influence is in the number of new studies on Civil War veterans as well as medical treatment of soldiers. You can also see it in the fast-growing field of guerrilla war studies and the challenges of occupation. Continue reading ““Passes! Passes For White Folks!””

Review of Smith’s Race and Recruitment

Here is my review of Race and Recruitment: Civil War History Readers, which was just published at The Civil War Monitor.

In recognition of Civil War History‘s 60th anniversary, the editors at Kent State University Press are releasing a series of books that feature some of the journal’s most important publications. The essays in the present volume, edited by John David Smith, cover a broad swath of the recent historiography of slavery, abolitionism, emancipation and memory. While the book is ideal for a graduate level course on the historiography of the Civil War era, given the narrow focus of many of the essays, it is unlikely that it will appeal to the general reader.

Click here for the rest of the review.