Tag Archives: Caroline Janney

Civil War Memory Roundup

Bagpiper at Wilderness 150 Commemoration

Bagpiper at Wilderness 150 Commemoration

Following in the footsteps of a few of my fellow bloggers with a short post on items from the past week that for one reason or another didn’t warrant a full post.

General News

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Common-place Marks the Civil War 150 with Special Issue

I couldn’t be more excited to share Common-place’s latest issue on the Civil War sesquicentennial that I had the pleasure to edit with Megan Kate Nelson. We are confident that each of you will find something of interest in this issue. The essays cover a wide range of topics and will hopefully both enlighten and entertain. Special thanks to all the contributors to this issue. We had the pleasure to work with an incredibly talented group of historians and educators, who were both committed to producing their best work and patient with our suggestions and numerous emails. Thanks also to the wonderful editorial staff at Common-place, especially Paul Erickson and Trudy Powers. Continue reading

Common-place Commemorates Civil War at 150

logo-cp-civilIn a few weeks the online journal, Common-place, will publish a special issue on the Civil War Sesquicentennial that Megan Kate Nelson and I edited. The issue features essays by Caroline Janney, Ari Kelman, Manisha Sinha, John Hennessy, among others. They cover a wide range of topics that will be of interest to academic and public historians, educators, and Civil War enthusiasts.

Megan and I are very excited about this project and are very much looking forward to its publication. For now we wanted to give you a little taste of the issue by sharing our Editors’ Note.

The Civil War at 150: Memory and Meaning

The making of Civil War memory began not only after the war ended, but also in camps, on battlefields, and in homes across the nation as early as the spring of 1861. Officers wrote battle reports and soldiers jotted down diary entries, describing their experiences and shaping the war’s many histories. They picked up cotton bolls and shards of trees, bullets and buttons, and sent these souvenirs home as records of their wartime experiences. After 1865, veterans and their families pondered these relics and thought about their wartime experiences, telling stories and sharing memories of those who had fallen in battle. Continue reading

Review of Caroline Janney’s Remembering the Civil War

JanneyHere is my review of Caroline Janney’s book, Remembering the Civil War: Reunion and the Limits of Reconciliation, which will appear in the next issue of the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography (pp. 389-90). It goes without saying that I highly recommend this book.

In 2001, David Blight published Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. The book won numerous awards and helped to shape a wave of academic studies that soon followed. Blight’s depiction of a nation that by the turn of the twentieth century had largely embraced sectional reconciliation at the expense of a legacy of emancipation also found a voice outside academic halls on National Park Service battlefields and in museum exhibitions. Many have embraced the narrative of emancipation and its emphasis on African American soldiers throughout the sesquicentennial commemorations as part of an effort to overcome a nation’s willful amnesia. Continue reading

While I Was Out

Just returned from a wonderful trip back to Montreal for the Jazz Festival. This was our third trip to the city for this festival and it is one of our favorites. I love the fact that you can drive roughly five hours from Boston to a city that offers a taste of Europe. We ate ourselves silly and caught a couple of excellent shows. Here are a few links to tide you over until I get back into the swing of things.

Upcoming Talks: On Thursday I head out to the Framingham History Center to work with area teachers on how they can introduce students to the study of Massachusetts Civil War veterans and Civil War memory. The center utilizes the city’s GAR Hall as a museum and lecture hall and includes a soldier statue by Martin Milmore out front. Given the subject of my presentation I couldn’t ask for a more appropriate setting and we will certainly make good use of it.

Those of you in the Boston area can catch me at the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation area on July 21. I am going to talk a bit about the Civil War Sesquicentennial and local sites related to Civil War memory. Should be fun.

Hope all of you are enjoying the summer.