Tag Archives: Civil War Art

Framed Don Troiani Prints For Sale

Update – 06/26/11: All of the Prints Have Been Sold.

"79th New York State Highlanders"

I am putting up for sale my collection of framed Don Troiani Civil War prints, which I’ve been collecting since 2000.  All of them were purchased through an authorized Troiani dealer in Fredercksburg, Virginia and include certificates of authenticity.  I am going to include an asking price, but please feel free to make an offer.  This is your chance to own your favorite Troiani print at a reasonable price.  I will take photographs of specific prints if interested, but they are all in superb condition. Note: Click the status report link for the print’s current value.

Battle Scenes

Regimental

Buyer will pay for shipping.  Happy shopping.

Really Bad Civil War Art

This latest edition of Really Bad Civil War Art comes to us from artist, Roberta Wesley.  This print is titled, “Rebel Yell” and is inspired by her own ancestor, who fought in the “22nd Infantry.”  Apparently, these men took into battle the Confederate flag currently flying over the junction of Interstates 4 and 72 outside of Tampa, Florida.

New Kunstler Print

Mort Kunstler’s latest print beautifully captures a crucial moment in the life of the Army of Northern Virginia.  The scene takes place in Orange County, Virginia following the army’s defeat at Gettysburg.  Kunstler vividly depicts the men in the army marching down main street, while Lee, Longstreet, and A.P. Hill discuss something.  As you can see, this is the exact moment in the war when both Lee and Hill simultaneously gestured with their right arms.  Longstreet, as usual, looks befuddled.  It’s hard to believe that this is the first print to depict this moment in the war.  If you are in the area you can meet Kunstler in person on Saturday at the Orange County Courthouse.

Oh That Gettysburg

Thanks to the folks at the Civil War Preservation Trust for putting on a first-rate conference.  I had a great experience and I look forward to the opportunity to help out again next year in Franklin, Tennessee.  My panel discussion last night was successful.  The audience asked some very thoughtful questions about the role and use of technology in the classroom and this was after a long day of walking the Gettysburg battlefield.  I can’t say how impressed I am with this organization.  Nicole Osier did a great job organizing the conference and it was a pleasure meeting the rest of the staff, including Robert Shenk and Gary Adelman.  The CWPT understands that saving battlefields is about educating the general public, especially our students, who will one day be responsible for taking on leadership positions in this good fight.  I can think of no better way of showing my support than by joining the CWPT and I encourage you to do so as well.

I especially enjoyed my time at Gettysburg.  This was my first trip to the battlefield with a group and it gave me quite a bit to think about.  For one thing I can’t tell you how many times I overheard references to the movie, Gettysburg.  Workshop presenters referenced the movie as did participants in casual conversations, and it was even mentioned on the tour.  I don’t necessarily have a problem with this, but I have to wonder whether folks are able to distinguish between a Hollywood interpretation and the history of the actual site.  It’s as if people view the battle and its participants through the lens of the movie.  Luckily, I didn’t hear any references to Buster Kilrain.  Even though the movie was released back in the early 1990s it shows no sign of letting up.  The actors remain popular attractions and even Mort Kunstler’s paintings look more like the movie’s actors than the actual historical figures.  The strangest and, in my mind, the most disturbing aspect of this phenomena is the bench dedicated to Michael Shaara that was recently placed in Hollywood Cemetery next to the grave of George Pickett.  How this was allowed to happen is beyond me, but I encourage you to take photographs of yourself doing something disrespectful on it having some fun with it.

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