Tag Archives: Civil War Boston

Thanks to the Civil War Trust

I had a wonderful time at the Civil War Trust’s annual Teachers Conference in Nashville.  Garry Adelmann and the rest of the staff did an incredible job of putting together a first-rate group of speakers.  It was a bit hectic having to give three talks in two days, but the chance to interact with my fellow history teachers made it all the more enjoyable.  The feedback on both my talk on Internet literacy and using Glory in the classroom were very positive.  As many of you know I used the black Confederate myth as a case study for the first talk and I was pleased that we did not get hung up on the subject as opposed to remaining focused on the crucial issue of how to effectively judge websites.  I got the sense that most of the teachers who attended the session had not given the issue much thought, which leads me to believe that much more attention needs to be given in workshops and seminars.

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Boston’s Two Freedom Trails

Looks like I’ve stumbled on my first public history scandal surrounding the Civil War since moving to Boston.  Before proceeding I should note that I am only vaguely familiar with the tours that are referenced in the article below.  On Wednesday I am off to Nashville to give two talks as part of the Civil War Preservation Trust’s Annual Teachers Institute, but when I return I hope to begin exploring much more of my new home.

The controversy surrounds the release of a new guidebook for Civil War Boston that was published by The Freedom Trail Foundation.  The Foundation is best known for its downtown tour of some of the most significant spots of the American Revolution, which may lead some to wonder why the organization decided to publish a short pamphlet on Civil War related sites.  Folks associated with the Black Heritage Trail are apparently not pleased with the scope of the pamphlet and its failure to acknowledge a number of important sites associated with the story of African Americans as well as the work of area institutions that are focused on black history.

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Civil War Memory in My Backyard

I pass by this monument every day on my way to Jamaica Pond for my morning run.  It was dedicated on September 14, 1871 and commemorates the 46 men of West Roxbury, “who lost their lives in the service of their country during the Rebellion.”  It has quickly become my favorite Civil War soldier monument.  I love the simplicity of it, including its smooth surfaces and clean lines.  The soldier embodies the virtues of the citizen soldier that northern towns embraced by war’s end.  He seems tired, but resolute as well as contemplative and just a bit sad.  In short, he did his duty when his nation called.

There are four names around its arches, including that of Lincoln, Farragut, Andrew, and Thomas.  The Jamaica Plain Historical Society suggests that the Thomas in question is none other than George H. Thomas of Virginia (the Rock of Chickamauga), who supposedly donated the land for the monument.  Perhaps someone can explain to me the connection given that he died in San Francisco and is buried in New York.  Now that would be an interesting Virginia – Massachusetts connection.

[Click here for more information about the monument from the Jamaica Plain Historical Society.]

Hello From Boston

I apologize for the lack of posts over the past week, but as most of you know my wife and I just completed a move to Boston.  We absolutely love our new home as well as the surrounding neighborhood.  I am enjoying a very cozy reading room surrounded by my Civil War library.  Our house is a short walk from a village area that includes a nice variety of restaurants and small shops.

Unfortunately, we are without Internet access until the middle of next week.  Let’s just say that our local Department of Motor Vehicles is more efficient than Comcast.  Although we’ve been tied up with house chores, we did manage to take a short walk through Forest Hills Cemetery, which is absolutely beautiful.  Along the way we found a number of noteworthy grave sites, including that of William Lloyd Garrison.

Posts may be sporadic for the next two weeks.  I have to make some final changes to my Crater manuscript and put together two teacher workshops for a Civil War Preservation Trust conference.  See you soon.