Tag Archives: Civil War Preservation Trust

How You Apply For a Job at the Civil War Trust

I absolutely love this video, which was done as part of an application for a position with the Civil War Trust. The applicant plays off of Ken Burns’s documentary and the popular short segment featuring Sullivan Ballou’s final letter home to his wife. Good luck.

 

Upcoming Talks

This morning I signed on to give a presentation at the Civil War Trust’s National Teacher Institute, which will take place in Charleston, South Carolina between July 12-15.  This is my third year working with Nicole Osier and Garry Adelman and I couldn’t be more excited.  If you are a k-12 history teacher, who has a particular interest in the Civil War you should attend.  This year I am going to talk about how to introduce students to the study of Civil War monuments.

For those of you who live in upstate New York I will speaking at Genessee Community College on March 6 about the battle of the Crater and historical memory.  Finally, although it’s not a public talk I can’t tell you how excited I was yesterday to receive an invitation to join David Blight and Brian Jordan in their Civil War Memory seminar at Yale at the end of March.

My summer speaking schedule is beginning to fill up, but please feel free to contact me to set up a talk, book signing or teacher workshop.

 

Civil War Trust Teacher Institute in Boston

I am forwarding this announcement to all of you in the Boston area who teach k-12 history.  This is a great opportunity for professional development in the area of Civil War history.  Boston has an incredibly rich history and here is your chance shape it for your classroom during the Civil War’s 150th anniversary.  I’ve been involved as a presenter so I know firsthand how valuable this experience can be.  It’s an opportunity to hear dynamic speakers, tour some of the area’s important historic sites, and best of all it’s a great networking opportunity.  Here is the announcement:

This October 8-9, the Civil War Trust will host another of its popular Teacher Institutes in Boston, Massachusetts. The Institute is a two-day professional development for K-12 educators focused exclusively on the American Civil War and its relationship to Massachusetts. The professional development is free, thanks to Connecticut-based touring company Tauck, but space is limited to 50 attendees. Teachers who attend are treated to outstanding workshops led by educators specializing in the history of the Civil War and instructional strategies for teaching the War; a hard copy of the Trust’s Civil War Curriculum complete with 27 lesson plans, including all associated worksheets and a disk with all digital materials; a tour of the Black Heritage Trail, led by the National Park Service; a tour of Fort Warren, led by the National Park Service; Continuing Education Units; breakfast, lunch, and dinner on the first day, as well as breakfast on the second day; a Seven Day Link Pass and, best of all, two wonderful days in historic Boston! There are still spaces available but they will be filled on a first-come, first-serve basis, so sign up now!  Click here for more information.

 

The Reviews Are In

Talking With a Group of Students on Monument Avenue in Richmond

Thanks to Garry Adelman and Nicole Osier of the Civil War Trust for sending along reviews of my two presentations, which I gave at their annual Teacher Institute in Nashville two weeks ago.  I assume they took out the negative reviews so as not to upset me.  All kidding aside, I couldn’t be more pleased with the feedback.  I gave two presentations.  The first was a tutorial on digital media literacy in the classroom – specifically the need to teach our students how to access and assess online information.  I used a couple of black Confederate websites as a case study.  Here are a few reviews.

“Excellent presentation.  I have been waiting for a session like this.”

“As a new teacher, I am still grasping how to teach using the internet.  This was very helpful!”

“Can’t wait to share this talk with my fellow teachers.”

“I have never had any formal training on evaluating sites – this was so helpful.”

My second talk focused on how to use the movie, “Glory” in the classroom.  I focused specifically on the kinds of questions that can be raised in class that asks students to think critically about the intersection of Hollywood and history.  Here is what the participants had to say.

“Fascinating presentation – will take a lot of this into my classroom.  Well done!”

“Kevin Levin was a good presenter who responded wonderfully to participant questions and comments.  This workshop will certainly impact how I use Glory and other movies in my classroom.”

“Entertaining and thought-provoking.  Let’s have more like this good give and take between presenter and attendees.”

“Absolutely stellar session.  We need more of this type of session!!”

This is one of my favorite talks to give.  I am currently working on an essay on Civil War movies for an upcoming issue of the OAH’s Magazine of History, which is being edited by Carol Sheriff.

Please let me know if I can help with your teacher workshop or any other event that involves k-12 history educators.  Sharing with my fellow teachers is the most important work that I do professionally.  Click here for a list of upcoming talks.

 

Thanks to the Civil War Trust

I had a wonderful time at the Civil War Trust’s annual Teachers Conference in Nashville.  Garry Adelmann and the rest of the staff did an incredible job of putting together a first-rate group of speakers.  It was a bit hectic having to give three talks in two days, but the chance to interact with my fellow history teachers made it all the more enjoyable.  The feedback on both my talk on Internet literacy and using Glory in the classroom were very positive.  As many of you know I used the black Confederate myth as a case study for the first talk and I was pleased that we did not get hung up on the subject as opposed to remaining focused on the crucial issue of how to effectively judge websites.  I got the sense that most of the teachers who attended the session had not given the issue much thought, which leads me to believe that much more attention needs to be given in workshops and seminars.

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