Confederate Flags are Gone With the Wind

The horrific shooting of nine churchgoers in Charleston, South Carolina back in June did not spark this public debate about the place of Confederate iconography in public places. Rather, it intensified it to a degree that few could have anticipated. Over the past ten years the Confederate flag has quietly (and on occasion not so quietly) been lowered from public places and removed from other institutions throughout the South and beyond. Southerners from all ethnic and racial backgrounds have had to wrestle with the question of whether the flag’s public display reflects their community’s collective values and view of the past.

For anyone who has followed this trend and the events of this summer, it is clear that Confederate flag advocates have been thoroughly defeated. Continue reading “Confederate Flags are Gone With the Wind”

Do Confederate Flags Belong in the Classroom?

This morning I received the following email:

I’m sure you’ll have an opinion on this. As you probably know, public schools are notorious for decorating the walls of classrooms. Naturally, I have a good bit of Civil War ‘swag.’ In the past, I’ve used the Confederate Flag in those decorations. It’s always in context with other battle flags of the Civil War, North and South. But given the recent events of the Summer, I’m going to scale it back a bit in display and visual interpretation. I was wondering what your thoughts were on it’s display in the classroom.

It’s a great question and one that I suspect others are considering or at least should be considering. I will make this short and sweet. Teachers have a responsibility to create safe classroom environments that are conducive to learning. Right now the Confederate flag is a toxic symbol. That means that it should not be visible in the corner of the classroom alone or even as part of a collection of flags. Beyond that it’s the teacher’s call, but I certainly would not want to risk making students unnecessarily uncomfortable or even intimidated. Continue reading “Do Confederate Flags Belong in the Classroom?”

Virginia Isn’t For Confederate Flags

This has been a tough week for folks who reduce the history of the South and Confederate heritage to the display of the flag. Yesterday evening the Danville City Council passed a flag ordinance with a vote of 7 to 2 limiting the flying of flags on city-owned property to the national, state, city and MIA/POW flags. I believe this is what the city of Lexington did as well to bring closure to this issue.

The Department of Motor Vehicles will also begin recalling specialty license plates featuring the Confederate battle flag. Continue reading “Virginia Isn’t For Confederate Flags”

Confederate Heritage Has Its Day at Stone Mountain

Jonathan Lee Krohn is posting some wonderful photographs on his Twitter feed at Stone Mountain, Georgia, where a Confederate flag rally is underway. It looks like everyone is having a good time. As to what exactly is being commemorated…well…that has yet to be determined.


Continue reading “Confederate Heritage Has Its Day at Stone Mountain”

There She Is, Miss RebelFest 2015

Miss RebelFestCongratulations to Taneka Lewis, who has been crowned Miss RebelFest 2015. Beyond this I don’t really know what else to say.

Perhaps I should just let the organizers speak for themselves:

On behalf of the Carolina Rebels Motorcycle Club – Sumter Chapter, we would like to congratulate the newly crowned Miss Rebelfest 2015, Taneka Lewis. Taneka was chosen Miss Rebelfest by the attendees of this year’s event. We look forward to having her as Miss Rebelfest for the upcoming year. Her strong spirit, along with her contagious personality, not to mention, she’s easy on the eyes, should make for a fun and exciting year! In a society that has labeled the confederate flag and the flag’s supporters a symbol of racism and divide; we feel we must also address what will eventually be ask sooner or later: Why is a organization that is called the Carolina Rebels which supports the Confederate flag as a symbol of Southern heritage, have an African American woman as their representative? Well, that is easy. Ms. Lewis was not denied nor was she chosen on her skin color. She was chosen by the many in attendance simply because she best resonated with them. She won with 80 percent of the votes. We are very excited and proud to introduce you to our new reigning Miss Rebelfest 2015, Taneka Lewis!

Taneka’s coronation will…oh why bother.