Tag Archives: Confederate History Month

Confederate History Month Proclamation Struck Down

This story just made my day. A few weeks ago the city of Griffin, Georgia passed a proclamation declaring April Confederate History Month. The public debate included a racist outburst by former Griffin City Commissioner Larry Johnson. Well, last night the community came together and demanded that the city council rescind the proclamation, which they did. Continue reading

Confederate Heritage Month Lite

Update: A reader of this blog just pointed out that the proclamation below is dated 2016. My apologies for the mix-up. Turns out that the 2017 proclamation is word for word identical.

This week Mississippi’s Governor Phil Bryant signed this year’s proclamation recognizing April as Confederate Heritage Month. The proclamation fails to say anything praiseworthy about the Confederacy or the men who fought in the ranks. Yes, it says that the men who served should be “honored” but offers nothing as to why it is justified. It is ultimately an exercise in saying the least possible without offending.

There was a time when Southern states were not embarrassed when recognizing Confederate History/Heritage Month. Continue reading

Redefining Confederate History Month in Mississippi

Last month I reported on efforts to add an interpretive plaque to the Confederate soldier statue on the campus of the University of Mississippi. At the time I expressed some concerns as did others.

It was unfortunate that the school’s history department was not consulted, but today they released a statement that includes their own revisions to the interpretive plaque. It is appropriate that such a statement is released during the state’s official recognition of Confederate History Month.

Mississippi Interpretive PlaqueClick here for additional information on the Atlanta History Center’s interpretive template.

Confederate History for All Virginians (if you can make the case)

Virginia Flaggers Facebook Page

Virginia Flaggers Facebook Page

I go into the classroom every day with the goal of trying to bring the past alive and to help my students pull meaning and lessons for their own lives. It’s not an easy task and I would be kidding myself if I thought that I succeeded in regard to every student that has ever entered my classroom or even a significant majority. I’ve reconciled myself to thinking about it in terms of degrees of success. I’ve never believed that we come hardwired to embrace and appreciate the importance of the past. It’s something that must be encouraged over time and with great care.

I was reminded of this as I was perusing my favorite Facebook pages instead of grading papers. In this post a prominent voice in the Virginia Flaggers whines incessantly that the governor of Virginia has yet to issue a Confederate History Month proclamation. There is still time and my money is on that it will eventually be published – thought it’s content will likely fall short of what it expected by certain circles. Continue reading

From One Southerner to Another: Just Say No to Confederate History Month

The governor of Virginia has yet to issue a proclamation for Confederate History Month or Civil War History in Virginia Month as his predecessor chose to call it. I am assuming that is just fine with fellow blogger and historian, Robert Moore, who writes from the Shenandoah Valley. Continue reading

Washington Post Supports Slavery Museum in Richmond

Richmond, Virginia is an ideal location for a slavery museum. The project would give Gov. Robert McDonnell the opportunity to leave office with a solid legacy of promoting Richmond’s rich heritage and history. It would also serve as the perfect bookend to McDonnell’s earlier misstep and thoughtful turnaround in connection with his Confederate History Month proclamation back in 2010. [see here, here, and here]

THREE MONTHS after he took office in 2010, Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell plunged headlong into a public relations debacle of his own making by omitting any mention of slavery from a proclamation he issued during Confederate History Month. After some ham-handed damage control, he apologized for airbrushing history, amended the proclamation to refer to the “abomination of slavery” and said he would be a “champion for racial reconciliation” as the state prepared to commemorate the Civil War’s 150th anniversary.

Mr. McDonnell, a Republican, has gone some distance to make good on that promise. Recently, he announced that his final budget, to be submitted to the General Assembly before he leaves office next month, would include $11 million for the construction of a museum and other sites to commemorate slavery, all in Richmond.

[Read the rest of the Post’s Editorial]