Earl Hess Reviews My Crater Book

crater lovellThe academic journal reviews of Remembering the Battle of the Crater are just beginning to appear. Overall the reviews have been very positive.  It’s encouraging to know that historians, who you respect, believe that the time it took to research and write was time well spent and that it constitutes a worthy addition to the broader historiography.  I was surprised that the book review editor of The Journal of the Civil War Era asked Earl Hess to review my book given that he contributed a blurb for the back cover.  Either way, it doesn’t get any better than receiving Hess’s stamp of approval in this particular journal.  I am thrilled with his review. 

There are definitely some things I would do different if I had it to do over again.  For one thing I would have done a better job of emphasizing the extent to which the 1903 and 1937 reenactments reflected the limits of sectional reconciliation. This would have situated the book more comfortably within a growing body of scholarship on Civil War memory.

The Journal of the Civil War Era (June 2013): 290-92

The Battle of the Crater, fought on July 30, 1864, as part of the third Union offensive during the Petersburg campaign, has drawn a good deal of attention in the past few years. Several books have been published dealing with the military history of the event, which now seems well covered in the secondary literature. Kevin M. Levin, however, has written a study not of the battle itself but of how it has been remembered over the past 150 years, with a special emphasis on the controversial fact that a division of black troops participated in the attack that followed detonation of the mine that created the famous crater. Many of those troops were slaughtered in the counterattack that restored Robert E. Lee’s line outside the city, shot down in cold blood by enraged Confederate soldiers. Continue reading “Earl Hess Reviews My Crater Book”

Crater Book Gets Its First Review

Thanks to fellow historian, high school teacher, and blogger Jim Cullen for taking the time to write a review of my Crater book for the History News Network.  Jim’s critique is thoughtful and raises some important questions about my interpretation.  I especially appreciate the following:

One also wonders about the next turn of the wheel. Like most historians of the last half-century, Levin renders this story as one of Progress. There was what really happened, then it got hidden by a bunch of racists, and now the truth has reemerged. Without denying the salutary consequences of writing African Americans back into history — or endorsing the mindless dead-ender insistence on “heritage,” whose advocates never seem to spell out just what they’re affirming a heritage of — one wonders if the story is this simple.  What are we in the process of forgetting these days? How can such absences be traced? Where might the story go from here? These are difficult questions, and it may be unfair to expect Levin to grapple with them. Perhaps he gets credit for doing so much so well that he provokes them.

First, let me say that I do indeed consider the broad parameters of this story as one of progress.  Early on one of the reviewers asked me to address some of these questions, especially the question concerning the future of our Civil War memory.  While I decided to bring the story to the present day I never felt comfortable about abandoning the traditional ground of a historian.  I suspect my next project will free me up in this regard.

I also agree with Jim that this story is predictable for those familiar with the literature, especially David Blight’s Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, which despite recent scholarly challenges, continues to exercise a profound influence on my thinking.  That said, I didn’t write this book primarily for folks familiar with the historiography.  Yes, I hope that the book appeals to scholars, but I wrote it primarily for folks who may never have read an entire book on Civil War memory.  I wanted something that would serve as an introduction and lay out some of the tough questions that Americans have grappled with over the years.

Finally, I really appreciate the kind words about my blogging.  In many ways, this book was made possible as a result of blogging and fits neatly into this broader project of how I’ve chosen to share my interest in Civil War history and engage the general public.