Crater Book Now Available From Audible

Crater AudibleI am pleased to announce that Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder is now available from audible. Jack de Golia did a solid job reading the book, which runs just under six hours in length. The audio version is half the price of the hardcover and even cheaper than the kindle version.

The news of the release caught me a bit by surprise, but apparently the book is still selling sufficient copies to warrant it. I also recently learned that there is a chance the University Press of Kentucky may release a paperback version in the not too distant future.

If any of you do purchase the audio version let me know how it goes.

A Camp Servant at De Battle Uv De Crater

Here is a little gem that I somehow missed in my research on the battle of the Crater. I will, however, include a few stanzas in my book on camp servants and Black Confederates. What follows is a poem written by a former camp servant who was present at the Crater on July 30, 1864. It was included in a book of slave reminiscences published in 1916 by Mary Louise Gaines. The poem was written by “Old Sam” and falls neatly within a body of postwar literature that glorified the Old South and the relationship between the races at a time of intense racial violence and political realignment following Reconstruction. Continue reading “A Camp Servant at De Battle Uv De Crater”

Crater Books For Sale Direct From Author

Update: 15 11 copies still available as of 4:00pm on May 14.

With the arrival of summer comes the opportunity to catch up on some history reading and with that in mind I would like to offer readers a chance to purchase my book, Remembering the Battle of the Crater: War as Murder at a significant discount. While the book lists for $35 you can purchase it directly through me for $25, which includes shipping costs. I am also happy to inscribe it for you. I’ve got around 20 copies left so don’t waste time if interested.

You can contact me here for additional information. Please fill out the subject field with “Book Purchase” and I will get right back to you.

The most recent review of the book comes from A. Wilson Greene in the latest issue of The Civil War Monitor.

…it is the most persuasively provocative Petersburg monograph in recent memory. Levin explains the unprecedented mayhem that characterized the combat on July 30, 1864, as akin to a slave rebellion in the minds of the Confederate defenders. It is also one of the best “memory studies” in that now large and often redundant field.

Click here for additional information about the book.

Boston Resident Remembers the Men of the Petersburg Campaign

I’ve expressed more than once my disappointment at not being able to spend more time in Petersburg, Virginia this past year to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the war. Apart from my participation in the 150th anniversary of the Crater I’ve had to look on from afar. But about two weeks ago I was suddenly overcome with an urge to commemorate the men on both sides who lived in and braved the earthworks around Petersburg from June 1864 to April 1865.

At first I wasn’t sure what I was constructing, but a few days ago I had one of those Richard Dreyfuss/mashed potato moments of clarity. From that point on my work proceeded with great energy and focus. What you see here is the northwest side of what I am calling Battery 5. Its walls stand 10 ft. in height and 3 ft. thick. This morning I began placing palisades around the wall.

I assure you that other than our neighbors no impressed workers were used in the construction of this section of the line. There are rumors of tunneling activities by the enemy.