“The slave-running drunkard and Ku Klux Klan leader, Nathan Forrest”

Although the Florida school district in Jacksonville, Florida has voted to change the name of Nathan Bedford High School there is still no word on what the new name will be. What follows is Susan Wittenberg Case’s recollection of what took place at the 1959 meeting that led to the school’s naming after Forrest. It’s important to note that the student body voted to name the school, Valhalla High. Continue reading ““The slave-running drunkard and Ku Klux Klan leader, Nathan Forrest””

A Reminder of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Greatest Battlefield Defeat

Nathan Bedford Forrest Monument Selma
Selma Police Department’s Sgt. Tori Neely dusts for prints in March 2012 after the bronze bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest was stolen from the monument that is placed in Old Live Oak Cemetery.

Earlier this week a settlement was reached in Selma, Alabama surrounding a monument to Nathan Bedford Forrest. You can read the story here.

Whether the photographer intended to or not, the accompanying image serves as a reminder that regardless of the battles that Forrest may have won during the Civil War, ultimately, he lost. And that is something that all of us can be thankful for today.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Nathan Bedford Forrest High School To Get New Name

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Forrest High School in Jacksonville, Florida

A long-standing dispute in Jacksonville, Florida has ended with the local school board’s unanimous decision to change the name of Nathan Bedford Forrest High School. As in other decisions about how to collectively remember the past, these decisions ought to be left to local communities. Continue reading “Nathan Bedford Forrest High School To Get New Name”

Nathan Bedford Forrest For Teens

Nathan Bedford ForrestWorried about who your teenager idolizes?  Well, now you can return them to the good old days of the Civil War and Southern chivalry with Lochlainn Seabrook’s book about Nathan Bedford Forrest that is geared specifically for teens.

Ride along with Forrest and get a firsthand look at his childhood in Tennessee, his teens in Mississippi, his first years away from home, his marriage and children, his multimillion dollar businesses, the start of the American “Civil War,” his enrollment in the Confederate army, and his rise to fame as a daring and successful Rebel officer.  Thrill to the dramatic descriptions of General Forrest’s exploits on and off the battlefield as he and his courageous cavalry (which included 64 black Confederate soldiers) fought their way across the South defending hearth, home, honor, and the constitutional right of self-government.

Find out why the General’s men loved and respected him, why the Southern people looked up to him as their “Spiritual Comforter,” and why he freed his slaves years before Lincoln issued his fake and illegal Emancipation Proclamation.  After Lincoln’s War, follow Forrest as he rebuilt his life from scratch, and helped the South regain her political power and dignity during the Yankees’ cruel and revengeful “Reconstruction” period.  See how the great Confederate chieftain lived out his final years campaigning for black civil rights, giving generously to charities, forgiving the North, and working to heal the physical and emotional wounds left by the War for Southern Independence.

Along the way, you will learn the truth about Forrest and Southern slavery and about Lincoln’s War on the Constitution and the American people, truths that have been hidden for a century and a half by uneducated enemies of the South.  Parents, you will enjoy reading this heavily illustrated compact little book as well, for it contains hundreds of important historical facts that neither you or your children were ever taught in school.

This guy’s basement press makes Pelican look mainstream.  I’ve perused these titles in the past, but this one takes the cake.  One wonders if the details behind that multimillion dollar business will be shared, but I won’t hold my breadth.  I have no doubt that this represents a rearguard action in how we remember and teach the Civil War, but it is hard not to be sympathetic with the few who will fall under its spell at no fault of their own.

Nathan Bedford Forrest, Race, and Memory in Memphis

Over at the Atlantic I share some thoughts about the recent controversy in Memphis surrounding the renaming of Forrest Park.  I hope the essay at least provides a bit of historical context to this issue.  Once again, thanks to Court Carney for making my job much easier.  Tennessee’s state legislature finally passed a measure making it illegal to remove monuments and/or change the names of public places in honor of military figures.  The legislation is not affect recent changes in Memphis.  Here is a short clip from the debate in Nashville between the sponsor of the bill and Representative G.A. Hardaway of Shelby County/Memphis.

The state of Georgia is now considering similar legislation.  There is something ironic about the passage of legislation by state legislatures to protect monuments to people who supposedly fought for nothing more during the Civil War that the right to make decisions through their local governments without outside interference.

[Click here for all my posts at the Atlantic.]