“We want to, as accurately as possible, portray what really happened.”

So, then why is Robert E. Lee in attendance at the reenactment of the 1865 skirmish in Aiken, South Carolina between Brig. Gen. Hugh Kilpatrick and Maj. Gen. Joe Wheeler?  Of course, I don’t want to make too big a deal given that Lee is what sells tickets. However, can someone tell me why Lee, portrayed by David Chaltas, is walking around with a cross in his hand?   Is there any evidence that he did this in the heat of battle?  On the other hand, Jerry Redmon is quite convincing – perhaps too much so.

The “Outer Limits” of Gettysburg

I came across an episode of “The Outer Limits” that deals with Civil War reenacting and the battle of Gettysburg. Many of you are no doubt familiar with what I like to describe as the poor cousin of the “Twilight Zone”, which ran from 1963-1965 and than again from 1995-2002. This particular episode features the singer, Meatloaf, as one Confederate Colonel Devine, and tells the story of two young men who are preparing to take part in a reenactment of Gettysburg. The episode reflects many of our popular beliefs about the Civil War, including the assumption surrounding the decisiveness of the battle itself and our love of counterfactuals. Both men are transported back to July 1863 for the purposes of carrying out a mission – a mission that they learn early on will challenge the notion of historical determinism. While the Union reenactor is quite concerned about their predicament, his Confederate friend fully embraces the opportunity to fight for states rights and against big government along with its long lines of “welfare recipients”. For him, this stroke of good luck is a chance to meet and fight alongside his Confederate ancestor for values that he believes they both must share. What is striking is that the viewer learns next to nothing about why the Union reenactor embraces the hobby. I have to wonder whether this is just another example of our inability to fully embrace the importance that so many attached to the preservation of the Union.

As the two friends work to figure out their mission the campaign and battle develop. Of course, since they come from the future they know how the battle will unfold and try desperately to steer it in a different direction. When it is announced in camp on July 1 that J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry will arrive shortly they announce that he is off on a “Glory seeing raid” and will not arrive in time. And, of course, they try to prevent “Pickett’s Charge” from taking place, which the producers mistakenly place on July 2. At one point the two friends end up on the battlefield with the Confederate reenactor’s ancestor, who they find is a coward and shares none of his descendant’s reasons for reenacting. For this ancestor the goal is simply to stay alive and is void of anything connected to principle. The encounter raises the suggestion that reenacting is as much (if not more) about our own perceptions of the past and/or cultural values than it is about the men who actually fought in it.

The episode takes a number of kooky twists before the real mission is finally revealed. Without ruining the plot, let’s just say that their goal is to prevent an assassination that would take place in 2013 on the Gettysburg battlefield. And let’s just say that with the election of our first black president this episode, which originally aired in 1995, is rendered that much more interesting.

Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5

“What Do You Mean We Can’t Fire Our Guns”? and SCV Lights a Menorah

Looks like a group of Confederate reenactors were told by event organizers in Smithfield, Virginia that while they will be allowed to march in an upcoming parade, they will not be allowed to fire their weapons.  The reenactors decided that the only reasonable thing to do was to “secede” for reasons of authenticity.

In other news, the state of Georgia along with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, United Daughters of the Confederacy, the Children of the Confederacy, and the Georgia Civil War commission [Have I left anyone out?] are going to honor the state’s Jewish Confederates.  I just want to say that as a Jew this ceremony is long overdue.  It’s nice to know that the service and sacrifice of tens of thousands of  Jewish Confederates is finally being recognized.  Seriously though, has anyone taught these people how to make a good potato latke?

Checking In With Our Friendly Confederate Reenactor

Here is Claude Tuberville of Mobile, Alabama on his preferred version of the Civil War:

The history being presented in text books is somewhat different than the version the re-enactors relate, Turberville said. He is a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV), an organization that studies the war. Members must have an ancestor who served in the Confederate Army. “First,” he said, “many people believe the Civil War was fought over slavery. It was not. It was initially about states’ rights and taxes. The South was being taxed to support the northern states.” “Black soldiers fought alongside white soldiers in the Confederate Army,” he said. “In the North, the black soldiers were segregated, and they continued to be segregated until the middle of the 20th century.”

Thanks Claude for sending a chill down my spine and for reminding me why I teach and research.