Public History

Update: More from Maya Little on why she vandalized the Confederate monument on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus with her own blood. Earlier this week Maya Little, a PhD student in the history program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was arrested for defacing the controversial Silent Sam monument. After spending a few Read more

A couple of weeks ago I did an interview with a Washington Post reporter for a profile story about Christy Coleman, who is the CEO of The American Civil War Museum in Richmond. I spent a good 30 minutes with the reporter and spoke about my professional and personal relationship with Christy. Most of it Read more

I can’t think of a better way to recognize Confederate History Month than with a historical marker that acknowledges an important aspect of that history. Yesterday, on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Calvary Episcopal Church, Rhodes College, and National Park Service unveiled a historical marker in Memphis Read more

History teachers that work in communities that include Confederate monuments enjoy a big advantage in their ability to introduce this ongoing debate about history and memory to their students. But even if you don’t have a Confederate monument close by there are other ways that you can bring the debate home to engage your students Read more

Last summer I took part in an NEH summer workshop at the Georgia Historical Society called “Recognizing an Imperfect Past: History, Memory, and the General Public.” In addition to delivering a lecture on monuments and Civil War memory I sat down for a brief interview with the GHS staff. We covered a lot of ground Read more

Few people are better positioned in former capital of the Confederacy to discuss its commemorative landscape than John Coski. I always enjoy listening to John talk about the history of the city that he loves and knows so well. This is a very accessible and though provoking discussion that explores the history and memory of Read more

Yesterday historian Aaron Astor posted a list of talking points on his Facebook page that he utilizes when discussing the Civil War with the general public. It is well worth reading in its entirety and I thank Aaron for permission to publish it on my blog. I want to push back a little bit on Read more

Keynote Address at NCHE 2018

Last year I joined the board of directors of the National Council for History Education. My first exposure to the organization and its members was the annual meeting that took place in Atlanta, Georgia. It has been a couple of years since I last attended an academic conference, but this one was right up my Read more